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Copy of Copy of MATABAGKA SEARCHES FOR THE DEITY OF THE WIND

Bukidnon
by

Christine Ancajas

on 22 January 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Copy of MATABAGKA SEARCHES FOR THE DEITY OF THE WIND

MATABAGKA SEARCHES FOR THE DEITY OF THE WIND
Bukidnon
Summary.
Agyo the Chief of Nalandangan is troubled.
His sister, Matabagka persuades him to confide in her.
Agyo tells her that Imbununga is going to invade Nalandangan.
If this happens, Nalandangan, and its people will be destroyed.
Imbununga is the keeper of the "Powerful Whirlwind."

Bukidnon
Located in Northern Mindanao.
The food basket of Mindanao.
The people.
According to oral history of the indigenous people of Bukidnon, there were four main tribes in Central Mindanao: the Maranao who dwell in Lanao del Sur, and the Maguindanao, Manobo and Talaandig who respectively inhabit the eastern, southern, and north-central portions of the original province of Cotabato. When the civil government divided central Mindanao into provinces at the turn of the 20th century, the groups included in the province of Bukidnon are the Talaandig and the Manobo.
Manobo Talaandig
only about 14%
Speak Binukid
Known as Lumad
Believe in one god, Magbabaya, who rules over lesser deities.
Summary.
Matabagka promises to help.
She takes her leave with her Binulay, her magic handbag with betel-chew inside.
She flies away on her Sulinday, a hat that she can turn into a flying vessel.
When Agyo finds out she has left, he orders a search party.
He wants Matabagka to return to Nalandangan.
Summary.
Propelled by a wind, she finds Imbununga's house.
She breaks in, and imbununga is speechless becasue of her beauty.
She pretends to be lost, but Imbununga will only help her if she marries him.
Imbununga traps Matabagka in his palace as his wife.
Agyo's search party has so far failed, making everyone nervous.
Summary
Although she has become Imbununga's wife, Matabagka is still on her mission.
She finds out where Imbununga keeps the Taklubu and Baklaw.
She drugs his betel nut, and escapes with the Taklubu and Baklaw.
summary
When Imbununga awakes and finds his things stolen, he orders his warriors to catch Matabagka.
His warriors overtake her, but she is a strong fighter and kills many of them, especially because Imbununga has ordered his men not harm her.
The sounds of the fighting attract the attention of Agyo's men.
Agyo's warriors join the fight, allowing Matabagka to escape to Nalandangan.
Summary
Matabagka is weary from the ordeal, and she is attended to.
While she healing she tells of her adventure.
She tells about Imbununga's concern for her safety.
Agyo decides to end the war.
He realized that having Imbununga on his side would strengthen his forces.
Summary
Agyo and his father go the scene of the fighting to speak with Imbununga, who agrees to end the fight.
But only on the condition that he know who stole his Taklubu and Baklaw.
When he finds out it was Matabagka, he become even more fond of her.
They end the fighting and Matabagka can bring back to life all those who died.
Matabagka is summoned to return the Taklubu and Baklaw.
Imbununga uses the Taklubu and Baklaw to stop the fighting.
Questions
What does this epic say about women?
Does the ending empower the female figure?
Is there a moral to the story? What is it?
Do you see any recurring motifs?
Full transcript