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Poetry Prezi

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Katie Smith

on 19 December 2012

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Transcript of Poetry Prezi

Poetic Devices "Cross"
Langston Hughes Denotation and Connotation "Those Winter Sundays"
Robert Hayden Imagery Figurative Language "then with cracked hands that ached from labor in the weekday weather" "Spring"
Gerard Manley Hopkins This excerpt provokes a feeling of soreness. The poet wants the reader to feel bad and have pity on the old man who is having to work in the cold, bleak weather.We have all had those moments when we have worked, and we are sore when we are finally able to rest. The cold weather around us does not makes these feelings any better. The author makes this poem relatable to the reader, who has already experienced this situation. "Nothing is so beautiful as spring-
When weeds, in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush;
Thrush's eggs look little low heavens, and thrush." Everyone pictures spring as a beautiful, sunny, and luscious time. Flowers blossom out of the ground. Little birds eggs can be seen as the clouds of heaven on earth. The author emphasizes the beauty to allow the reader to interpret the loveliness of springtime. The reader feels pleased and grateful that he or she has been able to enjoy the beauties of spring time. "My old man died in a fine big house.
My ma died in a shack." Simile: "Dream Deffered"
Langston Hughes "What happens to a dream deffered?
Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore-" A simile is a comparison of two things using like or as. Hughes is comparing deffered dreams to dried up raisins and festering sores. He is asking do our dreams dry up and become patchy or do they soil and go away completely. He uses this to give the reader two choices on what they think happens to lost dreams. Figurative Language 2 Symbol: "The Sick Rose"
William Blake "O Rose, thou art sick" Rose is being personified in this excerpt. It symbolizes a beautiful young girl. She is sick though because her relationship is ending, and she no longer feels passionate and as in love as her partner is. A rose is symbolized by the author because they are usually associated with love, and a sick rose means something is wrong with the love. Figurative Language 3 Irony: "I'm Not Complaining"
Philip Schultz "My folks were stingy with affection & my pets didn't live long, believe me, sympathy isn't what I'm after, I'm basically almost happy, God in all His wisdom knows that at heart I'm really not complaining..." This poem shows irony. During the whole poem, the speaker is stating all of the negative things that had happened in his life, yet, at the end he says that he is actually happy with his life, and he is not complaining about what happened in his past. The two points contradict one another and cause an ironic situation. The author's whole point was to show that this kid really is complaining even if he says he is not. Allusion "Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins"
R. S. Gwynn "No poisoned apple needed for this Princess," She murmured, makings X's with her thumb. A car door slammed, bringing her to her senses. Ho-hum. Ho-hum. It's home from work we come." The title in this poem is an allusion. It is connecting the seven deadly sins to the seven dwarfs. There is a young girl cleaning (Snow White), and she is saddened and says that she does not need a poison apple because her life is already bad enough. The "dwarfs" come home in the story singing "Ho-hum, Ho-hum. It's home from work we come." The sins coming back to the girl in the poem said the same as the dwarfs in the fairytale. The author uses "Snow White", who in this poem is a young Catholic girl, because she was practically perfect. The poem, however, creates her to be very flawed by the deadly sins. Personification: "Joy and Temperance"
Anonymous Joy and Temperance and Repose
Slam the door on the doctor's nose. Joy, Temperance, and Repose are all personified. These traits are all positive, and the poet is letting the reader know that staying optimistic will keep you away from illness. He adds people traits of "slamming the door" to make his purpose come across stronger. Tone "I saw on the slant hill a putrid lamb,
Propped with daisies. The sleep looked deep.
The face nudged in the green pillow
But the guts were out for crows to eat." Tone may be defined as the writer or speaker's attitude toward his subject, audience, or himself. At the beginning of this poem, the speaker seems content and relaxed by the scene of the lamb sleeping. His tone soon shifts once he realizes the lamb is dead with buzzards eating at its insides. The reader understands his tone by the words that he uses such as "hill", "propped", "daisies", "nudged", and "green pillow". His negative tone is expressed by "guts" and "crows". By defining his tone, the poet helps the reader know how to feel at different parts of the poem. "For a Lamb"
Richard Eberhart Musical Devices "Blackberry Sweet"
Dudley Randall "Black girl black girl
what's your spell to make
the heart in my breast
jump stop shake" Musical devices help poetic works flow and sound better. Through the poet's choice of words and rhythm, the poem has a prominent musical quality, and its meaning is reinforced. In "Blackberry Sweet", make rhymes with shake to cause a rhythm where the reader can comprehend the message easier. Jump, stop, and shake are used to create a dancing and moving effect; these words are also fun for the reader to say. The rhythm also makes the poem more enjoyable and more fun to read; it also gives a sort of comedic aspect. Denotation is the dictionary definition of a word, and connotation is what the word implies. In "Cross" the "big fine house" physically means a house, but in the poem the father died in the house compared to the mother who died in a shack. The poet is letting us know that the "big fine house" is rich and luxurious, while the "shack" is a lousy, cheap life. K. Smith Works Cited Hughes, Langston. "Cross" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 46.

Hayden, Robert. "Those Winter Sundays" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 56.

Hopkins, Gerard Manley. "Spring" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 58.

Hughes, Langston. "Dreams Deferred" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 78.

Anonymous. "Joy and Temperance" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 65

Blake, William. "The Sick Rose" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 82.

Schultz, Philip. "I'm Not Complaining" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 112.

Gwynn, R.S. "Snow White and the Seven Deadly Sins" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 127.

Eberhart, Richard. "For a Lamb" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 147.

Randall, Dudley. "Blackberry Sweet" Jordan. Lawrence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp. Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 1992. 168.
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