Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

The Sandbox - Edward Albee

A presentation for American Literature class at IUG.
by

Shaima' Ziara

on 14 May 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Sandbox - Edward Albee

The Sandbox by Edward Albee
Edward Albee
Major Themes
Outline
About Edward Albee
Absurdism
Summary & Analysis
Major Themes & Quotations
Presented by:
Afnan Sharawi
Shaima' Ziara
Theater of The Absurd
"The works expressed what happens when human existence has no meaning or purpose and therefore all communication breaks down, in fact alerting their audiences to pursue the opposite. Logical construction and argument gives way to irrational and illogical speech and to its ultimate conclusion, silence."
The Failure of the American Dream
The Deteriorating Values of the Society
Empty Family Relations
Broken Communication
Materialism
The Myth of Sisyphus
Summary & Analysis
- Born in 1928

- He has been an “unmistakable influence on contemporary American drama.”

- Best known for The Zoo Story, and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

- He has been considered “as a nihilist, social protestor, moralist, dramatic innovator, affirmative existentialist or absurdist,”
- Adopted by the multimillionaire Reed A. Albee

- Unhappy relationship with the family except Grandmother

- He used “his pen to criticize the moral and spiritual damage inflicted upon people by an excess of material wealth and misguided pursuit of the American Dream.”
- “A Brief Play, in Memory of My Grandmother (1876-1959)”
She died during the process of writing the play
She was the only one whom Albee loved, “unspoiled wealth”, “real values”
- The Young Man, 25, a good-looking, well-built boy in a bathing suit
Mommy, 55, a well-dressed, imposing woman
Daddy, 60, a small man; gray, thin
Grandma, 86, a tiny, wizened woman with bright eyes
The Musician, no particular age, but young would be nice
- “These names are of empty affection and point up the pre-senility and vacuity of their characters.”
- “Daddy (vaguely) Whatever you say, Mommy.
Mommy (with a little laugh) Well, of course…whatever I say, Then it’s settled, is it?”
- “Young Man (with an endearing smile) Hi!”
- “Mommy (with a little laugh) Wherever I say, of course. Let me see…well…all right, over there…in the sandbox. (pause) Well, what are you waiting for, Daddy? … The sandbox! (Together they carry Grandma over to the sandbox and more or less dump her in.)”
- “Mommy Don’t look at her. Just …sit here…be very still…and wait.”
- Grandma There’s no respect around here. (to the Young Man )There’s no respect around here!
Young Man (smiles ) Hi!
“a well-dressed, imposing woman”
“a good-looking, well-built boy”
“Young Man (with an endearing smile) Hi!”
“(Together they carry Grandma over to the sandbox and more or less dump her in.)”
“There’s no respect around here.”
“Grandma is discovered, still in the sandbox, lying on her side, propped up on an elbow, half covered, busily shoveling sand over herself.”
“Mommy (brightly) It is! Well! Our long night is over. We must put away our tears, take off our mourning…and face the future. It’s our duty.
Grandma (still shoveling; mimicking) …take off our mourning…face the future….Lordy! “

“Young Man I am the Angel of Death. I am…uh…I am come for you.
Grandma What…wha (then, with resignation)…ohhhhh….ohhhhh, I see. (The Young Man bends over, kisses Grandma gently on the forehead.)”
“These names are of empty affection and point up the pre-senility and vacuity of their characters.”

“Daddy Shall we talk to each other?
Mommy Well, you can talk, if you want to…if you can think of anything to say…if you can think of anything new.”

“and they moved me into the big town house with them…fixed a nice place for me under the stove…gave me an army blanket…and my own dish…my very own dish!”
“Anyhow, I had to raise … that over there all by my lonesome; and what’s next to her there…that’s what she married. Rich? I tell you…money, money, money.”
Grandma
Mommy & Daddy
Young Man
Grandma
Mommy & Daddy
The Young Man
The Musician
Pessimistic view of life.
Our existence is purposeless.
Hopeless Humanity.
Different play structure.
Little dramatic action.
Language
Full transcript