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IOU - Or perhaps you owe me..

A short presentation on plagiarism within the academic field, including some of it's rules and consequences.
by

Kiara Ab

on 27 April 2010

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Transcript of IOU - Or perhaps you owe me..

A presntation on plagarism and copyright IOU ...Or maybe you owe me By:Kiara Abdullah PLAGARISM Plagiarism, as defined in the 1995 Random House Compact Unabridged Dictionary, is the "use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work." Movies... ...Art... ...Music Within academia, plagiarism by students, professors, or researchers is considered academic dishonesty or academic fraud and offenders are subject to academic censure, up to and including expulsion. In journalism, plagiarism is considered a breach of journalistic ethics, and reporters caught plagiarizing typically face disciplinary measures ranging from suspension to termination of employment. WORDS. Some individuals caught plagiarizing in academic or journalistic contexts claim that they plagiarized unintentionally, by failing to include quotations or give the appropriate citation. But can words and ideas really be stolen?

According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. The expression of original ideas is considered intellectual property, and is protected by copyright laws, just like original inventions. Almost all forms of expression fall under copyright protection as long as they are recorded in some way (such as a book or a computer file). All of the following are considered plagiarism:

turning in someone else's work as your own
copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on "fair use" rules)
Educational tips on plagiarism prevention The most important steps in preventing plagiarism are those taken to address its causes. The strategies in this section are intended as guidelines to help you:

1. become aware of the reasons plagiarism occurs
2. identify the different forms of plagiarism
3. integrate plagiarism prevention techniques into your courses
Cite It http://www.plagiarism.org/plag_article_educational_tips_on_plagiarism_prevention.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plagiarism
http://www.google.com/#hl=en&ei=jrPES9KbCsP38Aauitm-Dw&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&ved=0CAgQBSgA&q=plagiarism&spell=1&fp=a2bb30ecf4f91972


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