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The Iatmul and Their Use of Masks

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by

Idana Tang

on 11 May 2011

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Transcript of The Iatmul and Their Use of Masks

Mai or Mwai Masks Mai masks are used to draw almighty and helpful spirits.
They can also be used as part of a dance costume called the tumbuan. This dance costume is used for the male initiation ceremony. How the Mask is Used Materials to make the Mask The base of the mask is made mainly from soft wood.
The mask is decorated with shells, pig tusks, and cassowary feathers.
Paint to color the masks is made from earth pigments and charcoal. What the Mask Represents The mask represents totemic names.
It can also represent mythical siblings of the clan.
They are shaped with human and animal shapes which represent spirits. The Iatmul people live in the Middle Sepik Region in Papua New Guinea. Papua New Guinea is the right side of the island New Guinea. Iatmul Culture One of the most common ceremonies the Iatmul practice is the Male Initiation Ceremony. During this, boys get scarred to look like a crocodile and become a man. The Haus Tambaran is a very important building to the Iatmul. It can be up to twenty-five meters. The Haus Tambaran has two floors. The bottom floor is used for debating and passing time, while the top floor is used for storing sacred carvings such as the flute. In the 1930s, European missionaries met the Iatmul people and helped most of them to convert to Christianity, though some of them are still very spiritual. Before the Iatmul were converted, there was a lot of voilence. by: Idana Tang http://chestofbooks.com/food/household/Woman-Encyclopaedia-3/The-Church-Missionary-Society.html http://www.art-pacific.com/artifacts/nuguinea/maskspko.htm http://www.lechateaugallery.com/servlet/the-14071/Antique-Papua-New-Guinea/Detail http://www.travcoa.com/find-a-journey/destinations/asia-%26-the-south-pacific/papua-new-guinea/papua-new-guinea-%26-the-sepik-river http://www.icollector.com/Fine-Tribal-Aboriginal-Art-International-Antiquities_as14263_p4 http://www.igr.gov.pg/esepik.html http://worldtravelwithanne.blogspot.com/2010_09_01_archive.html Thank You!!
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