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Stress Management - Chapter 1

PHED Lecture
by

Stress Management

on 3 October 2015

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Transcript of Stress Management - Chapter 1


Strive for balance in your life.
Even though stress can be challenging and useful at times, it can become chronic and excessive
Find the optimal level of stress
Key Lesson
5 Dimensions of Health
Acute stress – short term, sudden, intense, disappears quickly
Examples: Getting attacked by a dog; getting pulled over by the police
Episodic acute stress – repeated bouts of acute stress, extended over arousal
Symptoms include tension headaches, migraines, digestive problems, hypertension, chest pain and heart disease
Chronic stress – long term stress, unrelenting demands and pressures, last an interminable time
Examples: Long-term health problems, energy draining job, credit card debt
Terminology of Stress
Stressor – any event perceived as a threat that causes adaptation or the initiation of a stress response
Stressor is the cause, stress is the effect
Eustress – positive, desirable stress that motivates and inspires
Examples: going off to University, getting married, starting a new job
Distress – negative effects of stress that drains energy
Health begins to decline as well as optimal performance
Terminology of Stress


A strong social support system increases the capacity for handling the demands of life.
Dimensions Of Health


Making choices that not consistent with your core values can be stressful
Dimensions Of Health

Pertains to feelings
Involves experiencing and appreciating a wide range of feelings and the ability to express these feelings and emotions in a healthy manner
Emotionally healthy people use healthy coping skills to keep from becoming overwhelmed by feelings
Dimensions Of Health


Learning about stress is an important first step in preventing and managing stress
Dimensions Of Health
Physical Health
How can you promote physical health?

Stress is a risk factor for many serious health problems
Dimensions Of Health

“Modern man is sick because he is not whole”





Carl Gustav Jung

Health is more than the absence of disease and is more than just physical
Holistic health encompasses physical, intellectual, spiritual, social and emotional dimensions
The holistically healthy person is complete and balanced
Holistic Health
To a certain point, stress is healthy, useful and beneficial
When stress exceeds ability to cope diminished performance, inefficiency and/or health problems may result
Yerkes-Dodson Principle
Relationship Between Stress,
Health and Performance
Stress Management For Life
Chapter 1
Stress in Today’s World
Student Objectives
- Define the terms stress and stressor.
- Define and explain the difference between eustress and distress.
- Differentiate between acute, acute episodic, and chronic stress.
- Relate stress to the five dimensions of holistic health - physical, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and social.
- Discuss some of the most common stressors affecting college students today.
Stress in Today’s World
Students’ self-ratings of emotional health dropped to record low in 2010
Women were more likely than men to feel overwhelmed by all they had to do
31% of females reported feeling overwhelmed 11
or more times in the last 12 months compared
to 19.9% of males (American College Health Association, 2007)
Stress: What Is It?
A demand made on the adaptive capacities of the mind and body
“A scientific concept which is too well
known and too little understood.” -Hans Selye
Three Important Aspects of Stress
1. Your personal view of stressor
2. Your reaction to events in life
3. Stress is a demand upon the body’s capacity
Terminology of Stress
Stressor – any event perceived as a threat that causes adaptation or the initiation of a stress response

Stressor is the cause, stress is the effect

Eustress – positive, desirable stress that motivates and inspires

Examples: going off to University, getting married, starting a new job

Distress – negative effects of stress that drains energy

Health begins to decline as well as optimal performance
Acute stress – short term, sudden, intense, disappears quickly

Examples: Getting attacked by a dog; getting pulled over by the police

Episodic acute stress – repeated bouts of acute stress, extended over arousal

Symptoms include tension headaches, migraines, digestive problems, hypertension, chest pain and heart disease

Chronic stress – long term stress, unrelenting demands and pressures, last an interminable time

Examples: Long-term health problems, energy draining job, credit card debt
Holistic Health


“Modern man is sick because he is not whole”
Carl Gustav Jung

Health is more than the absence of disease and is more than just physical

Holistic health encompasses physical, intellectual, spiritual, social and emotional dimensions

The holistically healthy person is complete and balanced
Five Dimensions of Health
-How can you promote physical health?
- Eating healthy foods-Exercising
- Getting adequate sleep
- Avoiding alcohol and drugs
- Regular health screenings
- Stress is a risk factor for many serious health problems
The ability to think and learn from experiences, the ability to assess and questions new information, and the openness to new learning.



Learning about stress is an important first step in preventing and managing stress
Pertains to feelings

Involves experiencing and appreciating a wide range of feelings and the ability to express these feelings and emotions in a healthy manner

Emotionally healthy people use healthy coping skills to keep from becoming overwhelmed by feelings
Relates to the principles and values that guide a person and give meaning, direction, and purpose to life



Making choices that not consistent with your core values can be stressful
The ability to relate to others and express care and concern for others



A strong social support system increases the capacity for handling the demands of life.
Cortisol
Helps make energy available to enable effective responses, temporarily suppress the immune response, and sharpen attention

In excess may cause shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain structure required for the formation of certain kinds of memory

Neglected rat pups

Showed a more profound and excessive stress response that appeared to last into adulthood

Control rat pups

Showed appropriate stress response that does not become excessive

Stress and the Developing Brain
Fewer students are reporting above average emotional health
Students feel increasingly overwhelmed before entering college – twice as many females than males
Examples?
Yerkes–Dodson Principle
A specific amount of stress is healthy, useful, and even beneficial
Availability of social support
Developmental level of individual
Subjective Meaning of stressor
Number/Magnitude of stressors
Environment
Heredity
Factors influencing impact of stress
Nature versus Nurture
Invest your time and energy where it matters most!
Time Tip
Living Arrangements
School Pressures
Employment Decisions and Finances
Family Expectations and Family Life
Personal Expectations
Time Management
Sources of Stress
Daily Hassles
Choices
Information Overload
Environmental Stressors
Physical Health Issues
Relationship Difficulties
Sources of Stress
Three Basic Approaches
- Manage the stress
- Change your thinking
- Eliminate the stressor
Reflect: Reflect on how you felt
Respond: Plan and implement specific action to improve stress in one dimension
Review: List 2 specific things you currently do in each dimension to help you manage/control stress
Dimensions of Health
LAB
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