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Audrey Flack

Queen
by

Jessie Chung

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of Audrey Flack

Chanel, 1974
one of the four Civitas statues
Veritas et Justitia
Audrey Flack
Biography
Born in New York, 1931.
1953 Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, New York, NY
1952 BFA, Yale University, New Haven, CT
1948-51 Cooper Union, New York, NY
Education
2007 Honorary Ziegfeld Award, Keynote Speaker, National Art Education Association, New York City
2004 Honorary Doctorate, Lyme Academy of Art
1995-96 U.S. Government National Design for Transportation Award, presented by Jane Alexander, N.E.A. Chairman, and Federico Pena, Secretary of Transportation, awarded for the Rock Hill Gateway project
1994 Honorary Professor, George Washington University
1989-93 Member of the Board of Directors, College Art Association of America
1985 Artist of the Year Award, New York City Art Teachers Association
1982 Saint-Gaudens Medal, Cooper Union
1977 Cooper Union Citation and Honorary Doctorate
1974 Butler Institute of Art Award of Merit
AWARDS AND HONORS
Artist's Style
Painter and Sculptor
developed style studying realistic pictures - and adding her own touch.
sharp colours & contours, highlights & contrast
airbrushed to blend with other colours
she didn't just reproduce the photographs - she added emotional and symbolic depth to them.
painted things related to her experiences as a woman.
later changed preference to Goddesses and embodying female strength.
Part of the movement known as photorealism
"Art is a powerful force in this world, it is the visual representation of what we think and what we feel, and how we think and how we feel." ~ Flack
Marilyn (Vanitas), 1977
Continued ...
Queen
Queen, 1975-76, Acrylic on Canvas,
Louis K. Meisel Gallery
an abstract way to show the passage of time and how volatile youth and beauty is.
insignia of female power.
hints of sexuality.
imprints of her own life - making this piece autobiographical.
THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME <3
Full transcript