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Elizabethan Era Social Classes

Mrs. Maki 1st Hour


on 16 May 2013

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Transcript of Elizabethan Era Social Classes

Social Classes By: Megan Olson, MJ Lucas, and Liena Tang Gentleman Landholding Commoners Yeoman Laborers Poor and Unemployed Townsfolk Quiz! Gentle birth: both parents of yours are gentleman
Nobility: passed down through the eldest son
Knights: not inherited, mark of honor
Esquires: had knights in their ancestry
Clergy: Work in the church Freeholders: Land passed down through family
Leaseholders: lived with tenancies which were renewed
Copyholders: lived on land paying rent, no lease Equal to Leaseholders
Independent farmers with about 5o acres
Husbandmen: Produced for family, had little to sell worked with a high risk of being unemployed
cottagers: grazed animals, public grounds
servants: "part of the family" temporary stage, moving up What is the name of the highest social class?
Did Landholding Commoners own the land?
Why werent Townsfolk considered citizens?
Were Yeomen equal to Leaseholders?
Why were servants usually temporary? Lived in Towns, not citizens
Masters: owned their own buisness, Took journeymen or apprentinces
Journeymen: after 7 years of being an apprentice, free to sell or craft
Apprentices: started as a young teen, learn their craft or trade Children, widows, abandoned wives, elderly, and men returning form war
death due to disease
exchanges Thanks for watching!!
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