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Temperate Woodland

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by

Yuliana Lule

on 23 October 2014

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Transcript of Temperate Woodland

Temperate Woodland & Shrubland
Desirae Lee, Yuliana Lule, Parris Nathan
Food Web
Community Interactions
The Lynx
Grass
Gray Willow
Aspen
White Spruce
Bog Birch
Introductory
Aquatic Grass
Ground Squirrel
Snow Shoe Hare
Willow Ptarmigan
Insects
Moose
Red Tailed Hawk
Goshawk
Great Horned Owl
Red Fox
Lynx
Passerine Birds
Producers
Wolf
Northern Harmer Hawk
Primary
Secondary
Tertiary
This biome is mostly found on the western coasts of North and South America, areas around the Mediterranean Sea, South Africa and Australia
Detritivores
Earth worms
And
Decomposers
Fungi
Woodlice
They all feed off of the dead organisms in the area
Abiotic factors
The average rainfall is about 8 to 39 in a year.

The temperature in this biome can range from -22 to 86 degrees Celsius.

The soil is very thin, and does not hold a lot of nutrients.

The biome is usually located 30 to 40 degrees north of the equator.
The plants in the area have a waxy feel which is the plant retaining water to stay alive. However, the chemical coating the plant is very flammable and the plant burns easily.
Endangered
Predation:
*see food web
Mutualism:
humming birds feed off of a flowers nectar while pollinating it.
Commensalism:
mites living on beetles
The Impact of Humans
Cut down trees
Accidental fires
Collecting animal food sources
Acid rain
The Good and the Bad Happenings
Pollution
Global warming
Demand for wild life products
Treats to the Biodiversity
Renewable and non-renewable resources
What is being done to help
Renewable
Sugar Cane
Trees
Soil
Northern Harmer Hawk
Passerine Birds
Insects
White Spruce
Replanting of trees
Stricter laws dealing with poachers
THE END
No major cities
Full transcript