Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

science

science
by

brandon desnoyer

on 3 May 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of science

The water in your glass may have fallen from the sky as rain just last week, but the water itself has been around pretty much as long as the earth has! When the first fish crawled out of the ocean onto the land, your glass of water was part of that ocean. When the Brontosaurus walked through lakes feeding on plants, your glass of water was part of those lakes. When kings and princesses, knights and squires took a drink from their wells, your glass of water was part of those wells. This cycle is made up of a few main parts:

•evaporation (and transpiration)
•condensation
•precipitation
•collection Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers or lakes or the ocean and turns it into vapor or steam. The water vapor or steam leaves the river, lake or ocean and goes into the air. Evaporation The Water Cycle The water in your glass may have fallen from the sky as rain just last week, but the water itself has been around pretty much as long as the earth has! The water in your glass may have fallen from the sky as rain just last week but the water itself has been around pretty much as long as the earth has. When the first fish swam out of the ocean onto the land your glass of water was part of that ocean.When the Brontosaurus walked through lakes feeding on plants, your glass of water was part of those lakes.When kings and knights and squires took a drink from their wells your glass of water was part of those wells. Evaporation Evaporation is the process by which water is converted from its liquid form to its vapor form and thus transferred from land and water masses to the atmosphere. Evaporation from the oceans accounts for 80% of the water delivered as precipitation, with the balance occurring on land, inland waters and plant surfaces.
Percipitation In cold air way up in the sky, rain clouds will often form. Rising warm air carries water vapor high into the sky where it cools, forming water droplets around tiny bits of dust in the air. Some vapor freezes into tiny ice crystals which attract cooled water drops. The drops freeze to the ice crystals, forming larger crystals we call snowflakes. When the snowflakes become heavy, they fall. When the snowflakes meet warmer air on the way down, they melt into raindrops. In tropical climates, cloud droplets combine together around dust or sea salt particles. They bang together and grow in size until they're heavy enough to fall In cold air way up in the sky rain clouds will often form. Rising warm air carries water vapor high into the sky where it cools forming water droplets around tiny bits of dust in the air. Some vapor freezes into tiny ice crystals which attract cooled water drops.The drops freeze to the ice crystals forming larger crystals we call snowflakes. When the snowflakes become heavy they fall. When the snowflakes met warmer air on the way down, they melt into raindrops. In tropical climates, cloud droplets combine together around dust or sea salt particles. They bang together and grow in size until they're heavy enough to fall Water vapor is water in its gasy stage of liquid or solid ice. Water vapor is totally invisible. If you see a cloud fog or mist these are all liquid water not water vapor. Water vapor is extremely important to the weather and climate. Without out it there would be no clouds or rain or snow since all of these have their source in water vapor. All of the water vapor that evaporates from the surface of the Earth it returns as precipitation rain or snow. Water vapor is also the Earths most important greenhouse gas, giving us over 90% of the Earth's natural greenhouse effect, which helps keep the Earth warm enough to support life. When liquid water is evaporated to form water vapor, heat is absorbed. This helps to cool the surface of the Earth. This "latent heat of condensation" is released again when the water vapor condenses to form cloud water. This source of heat helps drive the updrafts in clouds and precipitation systems. Water Vapor evapotranspiration Just as you release water vapor when you breathe plants do too although the term transpire is more appropriate than breathe. This picture shows water vapor transpired from plant leaves after a plastic bag has been tied around the stem for about an hour. If the bag had been wrapped around the soil below it too, then even more water vapor would have been released, as water also evaporates from the soil.

Plants put down roots into the soil to draw water and nutrients up into the stems and leaves. Some of this water is returned to the air by transpiration. Transpiration rates vary widely depending on weather conditions, such as temperature humidity, sunlight avalability and intensity, precipitation, soil type and saturation, wind, and land slope. During dry periods, transpiration can contribute to the loss of moisture in the upper soil zone, which can have an effect on vegetation and food-crop fields
Full transcript