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The Great Gatsby

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Stephen Moschini

on 20 February 2014

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Transcript of The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby
The American Dream and the 1920s
The Lost
Generation
The "Lost Generation" referred to the young people that survived World War I. These young Americans wanted to be different than the generation before them. Some members of the "Lost Generation" were Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, and Edward Estlin Cummings. Most of the members of this generation ended up leaving the US to find a purpose for their life
(Freund, "Lost Generation").
Class/Social
Divides in the 1920's
F. Scott Fitzgerald and
Zelda Fitzgerald
F. Scott Fitzgerald was a famous writer and wrote the novel,
The Great Gatsby
. He also became famous for writing many other novels. He lived through the great 1920's and the Great Depression in the 1930's. Toward the end of himself as a failure. He eventually died from a heart attack at the age of 44. Zelda Fitzgerald was his wife. She called off the marriage at first because she did not want to wait for him to have success and did not want to live off his poor salary. She was a dancer and eventually became ill from it. She was in and out of hospitals for mental reasons. She eventually died in a hospital fire (Oakes, "Fitzgerald, F. Scott").
1920's Fashion
During the 1920's, fashion changed from a dress code to being able to wear what you would like. The flapper became a look based off haute couture. Haute couture became more mass produced during the 1920's. What you were could represent your view of politics, class, or race (Coco, "Clothing and Fashion in the 20th Century").
Sports
Entertainment
1920's Technology
and Automobiles
Temperance
and
Prohibition
Crime
Stephen Moschini
Mrs. Smith
English 4
10 February 2014
Works
Cited

Freund, Steve. "Lost Generation." In Faue, Elizabeth, and Gary B. Nash, eds. Encyclopedia of American History: The Emergence of Modern America, 1900 to 1928, Revised Edition (Volume VII). New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2010. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EAHVII143&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 6, 2014).
The American Dream talked about if you worked hard and followed the rules then you would have a good life. It also says that Americans have the freedom to do what they want. The view of it has changed over the years. Now people think it is having a house and car, putting their children through college, and enjoying retirement
("A Better Life-Creating the American Dream").
The class divides in the 1920's were Upper, Middle, and Lower. During the 1920's workers were fighting for eight hour days and shorter workweeks. The middle class were also starting to buy cars since the price dropped (Myers, "Leisure and Recreation in the 20th Century").
"American RadioWorks - A Better Life." American RadioWorks - A Better Life. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Feb. 2014.

Website
Myers, Molly. "leisure and recreation in the 20th century." In Kupperman, Karen Ordahl, ed. American Centuries: The Ideas, Issues, and Values That Shaped U.S. History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2011. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=AMCE175&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 7, 2014).
Oakes, Elizabeth H. "Fitzgerald, F. Scott." American Writers, American Biographies. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2004. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=AW085&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 8, 2014).
Coco, Adrienne Phelps. "clothing and fashion in the 20th century." In Kupperman, Karen Ordahl, ed. American Centuries: The Ideas, Issues, and Values That Shaped U.S. History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2011. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=AMCE157&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 8, 2014).
During the 1920's, sports went through a "Golden Age." Baseball became a popular sport because of help from the great Babe Ruth. Football also started to become popular on the college level. Golf was not even a professional sport yet being mainly played at country clubs. Tennis was also on the same level as golf was. For hockey, the NHL was present, but with few teams that had mainly players from Canada (Thompson, "Sports, 1929-1945").
Thompson, William J. "sports, 1929–1945." In Jeffries, John W., and Gary B. Nash, eds. Encyclopedia of American History: The Great Depression and World War II, 1929 to 1945, Revised Edition (Volume VIII). New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2010. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EAHVIII290&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 8, 2014).
Popular forms of entertainment included concerts, television, movies, and radio. The first radio broadcast happened in Pittsburgh when at least three million homes had radios in them. People turned on their televisions in the 1920's to see shows based on the past. The theater industry already existed but it continued to grow in the 20's by moving to bigger and better stages. During this decade the entertainment industry had a huge boost in profit and it even continued during the Great Depression (Faue, "Popular Entertainment, 1890-1930").
Faue, Elizabeth. "popular entertainment, 1890–1930." In Faue, Elizabeth, and Gary B. Nash, eds. Encyclopedia of American History: The Emergence of Modern America, 1900 to 1928, Revised Edition (Volume VII). New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2010. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EAHVII076&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 8, 2014).
By 1920 at least one-third of households had telephones in them. The computer was also starting to develop during the 20's (Sterling, "Communication in the 20th Century"). The Model T was already existent, but grew even more popular during this time. Since highways were starting to be built more people kept buying cars which were affordable (Johnston, "Transportation in the 20th Century").
Sterling, Christopher H. "communication in the 20th century." In Kupperman, Karen Ordahl, ed. American Centuries: The Ideas, Issues, and Values That Shaped U.S. History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2011. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=AMCE158&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 9, 2014).
Temperance and prohibition both had to deal with alcohol. For women, it meant having a husband who did not drink. Some women would not marry a man who drank (Glass, "Temperance Movement"). Prohibition, also known as the eighteenth amendment, was the banning of alcohol products in the US. After this happened people started smuggling alcohol into the US from outside countries (Freund, "Prohibition").
Glass, Matthew. "temperance movement." In Queen, Edward L., II, Stephen R. Prothero, and Gardiner H. Shattuck Jr., eds. Encyclopedia of American Religious History, Third Edition. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2009. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EARR0658&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 9, 2014).
Freund, Steve. "Prohibition." In Faue, Elizabeth, and Gary B. Nash, eds. Encyclopedia of American History: The Emergence of Modern America, 1900 to 1928, Revised Edition (Volume VII). New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2010. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EAHVII212&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 9, 2014).
The main crime problem during the 1920's was the Mafia. They came over to the US a couple decades before but were still causing problems in the 20's. Their leader was even killed but that did not stop them. The Mafia finally ended up dying down. Even with new leaders it could not keep going on. So that meant good things for US citizens and even other countries (Sifakis, "Mafia").
Sifakis, Carl. "Mafia." The Encyclopedia of American Crime, Second Edition. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2001. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?
ItemID=WE52&iPin=EAC0907&SingleRecord=True (accessed February 9, 2014).
Full transcript