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la guerra sucia 1

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by

Alison Brink

on 25 May 2018

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Transcript of la guerra sucia 1

viernes
el
tres
de
mayo

lo esperado
aprender un poco acerca de la historia politica de la Argentina
en sus grupos de 4
definan las palabras en inglés
populist government
authoritarian govt.
patronage
totalitarian regimes
cooptation
passive and manipulated urban masses
naive proletarians
demagogues
political propaganda
intangible
epithet
atomised citizen
bequeathed
constituted
universal suffrage
fas·cist
ˈfaSHəst/
noun
1.
an advocate or follower of fascism.
synonyms: authoritarian, totalitarian, autocrat, extreme right-winger, rightist; More
adjective
1.
of or relating to fascism.
"a military coup threw out the old fascist regime"
synonyms: authoritarian, totalitarian, dictatorial, despotic, autocratic, undemocratic, illiberal; More

An inherent aspect of fascist economies was an economy where the government exerts strong directive influence over investment, as opposed to having a merely regulatory role. In general, apart from the nationalizations of some industries, fascist economies were based on private individuals being allowed property and private initiative, but these were contingent upon service to the state.[5]

Fascism operated from a Social Darwinist view of human relations. The aim was to promote superior individuals and weed out the weak.[6] In terms of economic practice, this meant promoting the interests of successful businessmen while destroying trade unions and other organizations of the working class.[7] Fascist governments encouraged the pursuit of private profit and offered many benefits to large businesses, but they demanded in return that all economic activity should serve the national interest.[8] Historian Gaetano Salvemini argued in 1936 that fascism makes taxpayers responsible to private enterprise, because "the State pays for the blunders of private enterprise... Profit is private and individual. Loss is public and social."[9]
Was Peron a populist or authoritarian ruler?
populist
authoritarian
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IYHO...?
Does this type of leader bring more stabilizing or destabilizing effects to a nation in the long term? Why?
Full transcript