Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Lithium, Sodium and Potassium

No description
by

Andreas Frame

on 29 August 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Lithium, Sodium and Potassium

Bibliography
Lithium, Sodium and Potassium
Andreas Frame and Ramin Javaheri
1."Lithium." Pictures, Stories, and Facts about the Element in the Periodic Table. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Aug. 2013. http://www.periodictable.com/Elements/011/index.html

2."Sodium." Pictures, Stories, and Facts about the Element in the Periodic Table. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Aug. 2013. http://www.periodictable.com/Elements/011/index.html

3."Potassium." Pictures, Stories, and Facts about the Element in the Periodic Table. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Aug. 2013. http://www.periodictable.com/Elements/011/index.html

4."The Group 1 Elements." BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2013.http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/add_ocr_gateway/periodic_table/group1rev1.shtml

5."Chemical Data." Visual Elements: Group 1 - The Alkali Metals. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. <http://www.rsc.org/chemsoc/visualelements/pages/data/intro_groupi_data.html>.

6. "Alkali Metals in Water." YouTube. YouTube, 11 May 2009. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. <"Alkali Metals in Water." YouTube. YouTube, 11 May 2009. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. <

7."Lithium (Li) and the "lithium Problem"" Lithium and the "lithium Problem" N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. <http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lithium.html>

8. "What On Earth Lithium." Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Aug. 2013. <https://uwaterloo.ca/earth-sciences-museum/what-earth/what-earth-minerals/what-earth-lithium>.

9. Clark, Jim. "Atomic and Physical Properties of Periodic Table Group 1." Atomic and Physical Properties of Periodic Table Group 1. N.p., 2005. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic/group1/properties.html>.
Assignment
Group 3: Ramin Javaheri & Andreas Frame
Describe lithium, sodium and potassium in Group I as a collection of relatively soft metals showing a trend in melting point and reaction with water.
Give some background information about the elements in Group 1, include pictures.
Create a graph using the database provided to obtain melting points for each element in group 1. Plot atomic # on the x axis and melting point in degrees C on the y axis.
Your graph must be created digitally and you should be prepared to explain the data (why does melting point change as you go down the group?).
Find a video clip that shows the reactivity of Group 1 metals with water.
Predict the properties of other elements in Group I, given data where appropriate.
All of the elements that are highlighted red, are Group 1 elements.
Appearance:

All the elements in Group 1 are silvery metals. They are also soft, and can be easily cut with a knife. When a shiny surface is exposed, it dulls because of oxidation.
1
2
3
4
General Reactivity:

All these elements are highly reactive. The reactivity increases as you go down on the list of elements in Group 1.
Occurrence and Extraction:

These elements are so reactive that they are not easily found in nature. Sodium is mainly found as NaCI (salt) in sea-water. Potassium is more widely distributed in minerals but is also extracted from sea-water.
Fun Fact: The alkali metals are so reactive that they can't be displaced by other elements, so they are isolated in the process of electrolysis by their molten salts.
The Group 1 metals differ from other metals. For example, they have low melting and boiling temperatures. Li, Na and K are less dense than water which makes them float.
7.
8.
Why do the boiling points decrease?

The elements are held together by the attraction between the nuclei and the electrons. Hence, when the atom gets bigger the electrons are further from the nuclei making the attraction weaker. The weaker attraction means that less energy is required to break these bonds apart from each other. Less heat energy is needed to change the elements into their molten states.

9.
Full transcript