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Copy of Copy of Ms Ryan's Elements and Principles of Art and Design

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Lachelle Farris

on 9 August 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Copy of Ms Ryan's Elements and Principles of Art and Design

The Elements
of Art & Design

Line
Implies movement and direction. Outlines the form of shapes and is used to suggest mood.
Which tools and mediums have been used? Has the artist applied a lot of pressure?
Shape
Describes a 2D area.
Shapes can be: open or closed, positive or negative, free-form or geometric....
Form
3D quality of a shape.
Can be implied via tone/shadow or may physically be a sculptural, 3D artwork.
Texture
Refers to surface quality... Can be seen or touched.
Can be simulated via: stippling, hatching, cross-hatching, scumbling...
Red, blue, yellow, green, orange, purple.... Remember the colour wheel?
Artists may use colour for a symbolic,
descriptive, decorative purpose....
Tone
Colour
Refers to the degree of light or dark in colour and forms.
Intensity
Describes the degree of brightness a colour has.
The Principles
of Art & Design


Consider the sense of order and equilibrium between elements in an artwork.
An imbalanced artwork can make you feel awkwardness or discomfort, a balanced artwork may make you feel calm and order.
Balance
Juxtaposition of opposite qualities in an artwork.
High contrast can be used to: emphasise, dramatise, add variety and surprise.
Low contrast can be used to: soothe, settle, harmonise and comfort.
Contrast
Emphasis
Is used to call attention to specific area(s)
within an artwork.
Points to the focal point of an artwork.
Movement
Elements are manipulated to imply motion and guide the viewer's eye
over the artwork.
Can be implied through recognisable images in action or through abstract, non-representational marks like: diagonal lines, broken edges or a gradation of tones.
Pattern
The repetition of similar motifs on a surface, to create rhythm, organise/unify an object or simply to enrich an image.
Unity
Refers to all elements and qualities in an artwork working together to create a sense of 'oneness' in the composition of an artwork.
Unity can produce feelings of harmony, completeness and order.
A lack of unity can be used to imply disharmony, incompleteness and disorder.
Adjectives to describe lines: weak, strong, dominant, thin, thick, directional, broken, jagged, straight, curved, gestural, wavy.
Adjectives to describe form: rounded, square, angular, textural, volume and mass may be considered..(is the form heavy or light?)
Adjectives to describe shape: solid, organic, repeated, symbolic, proportional, asymmetrical.
Adjectives to describe texture: shiny, smooth, rough, coarse, gritty, granular, soft.
Image details and references
Adjectives to describe colour: bright, vivid, pastel, warm, cool, in harmony, discordant, realistic or abstract, monochromatic.
Colour has tone and intensity........
Adjectives to describe intensity: bright, vivid, strong, weak, radiant, dull.
Adjectives to describe tone: dark, dull, gloomy, stark, strong,
weak, transparent or opaque.
Adjectives used to describe balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical, formal, informal, rigid or random.
Egon Schiele, Self Portrait, 1913, pencil on paper.
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/schiele/
Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907, oil on canvas.
http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/les-demoiselles-davignon
Henry Moore, Seated Woman, 1956-7, Bronze.
http://gordon.shecket.org/ScuptureGardens/Hirshhorn2006.htm
Line
Shape
Form
Texture
Margarete, 1981, Anselm Keifer, oil and straw on canvas.
http://orioren.com/blog/?p=4747
Luke Nguyen's Green tomato salald
http://www.bizzylizzysgoodthings.com/2/post/2012/04/luke-nguyens-green-tomato-salad.html
Colour
Kandinsky, Sketch for Composition VII, 1913, oil on canvas.
http://www.invisiblebooks.com/Kandinsky.htm
Intensity
Mark Rothko, Ochre and Red on Red, 1954, oil on canvas.
http://www.usc.edu/programs/cst/deadfiles/lacasis/ansc100/library/images/766.html
Balance
Jeffrey Smart, Cahill Expressway, 1962, oil on plywood.
http://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/col/work/3000

Frances Bacon, Self Portrait, 1971, oil on canvas.
http://www.artyfactory.com/art_appreciation/portraiture/bacon/francis_bacon.htm
Contrast
Rembrandt Van Rijn, Portrait of Saskia van Uylenburg, c. 1635, oil on canvas.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rembrandt
Movement
Marcel Duchamp, Nude Descending a Staircase no. 2, 1912, oil on canvas.
http://ghpoetryplace.blogspot.com.au/2010/10/nude-descending-staircase-no-2.html
Pattern
Gustav Klimt, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, 1907, oil, silver and gold on canvas.
http://only10000hours.wordpress.com/

Bridget Riley, Start, 2000, Screenprint.
http://www.heliumfoundation.com/artwork.php?id=247
Unity
Le Corbusier, the chapel of Notre Dame du Haut, Ronchamp, 1954.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2008/oct/07/lecorbusier.architecture
Full transcript