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Microsoft Office Excel 2007

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Sarah Jane Nicolas

on 6 January 2014

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Transcript of Microsoft Office Excel 2007

Syntax Order:

1. All functions begin with the = sign.
2. After the = sign define the function name (e.g., Sum).
3. Then there will be an argument. An argument is the cell range or cell references that are enclosed by parentheses. If there is more than one argument, separate each by a comma.
Starting a Workbook
You will need to know how to insert text and numbers into Excel workbooks to be able to use it to calculate, analyze, and organize data. In this lesson, you will learn how to create a new workbook, insert and delete text, navigate a worksheet, and save an Excel workbook.
• Select New. The New Workbook dialog box opens and Blank Workbook is highlighted by default.
• Click Create. A new, blank workbook appears in the window.
To Insert Text:

• Left-click a cell to select it. Each rectangle in the worksheet is called a
cell
. As you select a cell, the cell address appears in the Name Box.

When you first open Excel, the software opens to a new, blank workbook.
• Enter text into the cell using your keyboard. The text appears in the cell and in the formula bar.
To Edit or Delete Text:

• Select the cell.
• Press the Backspace key on your keyboard to delete text and make a correction.
• Press the Delete key to delete the entire contents of a cell.

You can also make changes to and delete text from the formula bar. Just select the cell and place your insertion point in the formula bar.
To Move Through a Worksheet Using the Keyboard:

• Press the Tab key to move to the right of the selected cell.
• Press the Shift key and then the Tab key to move to the left of the selected cell.
• Use the Page Up and Page Down keys to navigate the worksheet.
• Use the arrow keys.

To Save the Workbook:

• Left-click the Microsoft Office Button.
• Select Save or Save As.


You can save a workbook in many ways, but the two most common are as an Excel Workbook, which saves it with a 2007 file extension, and as an Excel 97-2003 Workbook, which saves the file in a compatible format so people who have earlier versions of Excel can open the file.
Modifying Columns, Rows, and Cells
To Create a New, Blank Workbook:


Left-click the Microsoft Office Button.

When you open a new, blank workbook, the cells, columns, and rows are set to a default size. You do have the ability to change the size of each, and to insert new columns, rows, and cells, as needed. In this lesson, you will learn various methods to modify the column width and row height, in addition to how to insert new columns, rows, and cells.
To Modify Column Width:

• Position the cursor over the column line in the column heading and a double arrow will appear.

• Left-click the mouse and drag the cursor to the right to increase the column width or to the left to decrease the column width.

• Release the mouse button.

OR

• Left-click the column heading of a column you'd like to modify. The entire column will appear highlighted.

• Click the Format command in the Cells group on the Home tab. A menu will appear.
• Select Column Width to enter a specific column measurement.

• Select AutoFit Column Width to adjust the column so all the text will fit.

To Modify the Row Height:
• Position the cursor over the row line you want to modify and a double arrow will appear.

• Left-click the mouse and drag the cursor upward to decrease the row height or downward to increase the row height.

• Left-click the mouse and drag the cursor upward to decrease the row height or downward to increase the row height.

• Release the mouse button.

OR

• Click the Format command in the Cells group on the Home tab. A menu will appear.
• Select Row Height to enter a specific row measurement.
• Select AutoFit Row Height to adjust the row so all the text will fit.

To Insert Rows:
• Select the row below where you want the new row to appear.
• Click the Insert command in the Cells group on the Home tab. The row will appear.
The new row always appears above the selected row.

Make sure that you select the entire row below where you want the new row to appear and not just the cell. If you select just the cell and then click Insert, only a new cell will appear.

To Insert Columns:
• Select the column to the right of where you want the column to appear.
• Click the Insert command in the Cells group on the Home tab. The column will appear.
The new column always appears to the left of the selected column. For example, if you want to insert a column between September and October, select the October column and click the Insert command
Make sure that you select the entire column to the right of where you want the new column to appear and not just the cell. If you select just the cell and then click Insert, only a new cell will appear.
To Delete Rows and Columns:

• Select the row or column you’d like to delete.
• Click the Delete command in the Cells group on the Home tab.

Creating Simple Formulas
Excel can be used to calculate and analyze numerical information; however, you will need to know how to write formulas to maximize Excel's capabilities. A formula is an equation that performs a calculation using values in the worksheet. In this lesson you will learn how to create simple formulas using mathematical operators such as the addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division signs.


• Click the cell where the formula will be defined (C5, for example).
• Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
• Type the first number to be added (e.g., 1500)
• Type the addition sign (+) to let Excel know that an add operation is to be performed.
• Type the second number to be added (e.g., 200)
• Press Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar to complete the formula.

Excel will not always tell you if your formula contains an error, so it's up to you to check all of your formulas.

• Click the cell where the answer will appear (C5, for example).
• Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
• Type the cell number that contains the first number to be added (C3, for example).
• Type the addition sign (+) to let Excel know that an add operation is to be performed.
• Type the cell address that contains the second number to be added (C4, for example).
• Press Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar to complete the formula.

To Create a Simple Formula
that Adds Two Numbers:
To Create a Simple Formula that
Adds the Contents of Two Cells:
To Create a Simple Formula using
the Point and Click Method:
• Click the cell where the answer will appear (C30, for example).
• Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
• Click on the first cell to be included in the formula (C5, for example).
• Type the subtraction sign (-) to let Excel know that a subtraction operation is to be performed.
• Click on the next cell in the formula (C29, for example).

• Press Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar to complete the formula.
To Create a Simple Formula that
Multiplies the Contents of Two Cells:

• Select the cell where the answer will appear (E32, for example).
• Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
• Click on the first cell to be included in the formula (C9, for example) or type a number.
• Type the multiplication symbol (*) by pressing the Shift key and then the number 8 key. The operator displays in the cell and Formula bar.
• Click on the next cell in the formula or type a number (12, for example).
• Press Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar to complete the formula.


• Click the cell where the answer will appear.
• Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
• Click on the first cell to be included in the formula.
• Type a division symbol. The operator displays in the cell and Formula bar.
• Click on the next cell in the formula.
• Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar to complete the formula.

To Create a Simple Formula that
Divides One Cell by Another:
Using Cell References
As you can see, there are many ways to create a simple formula in Excel. Most likely you will choose one of the methods that enters the cell address into the formula, rather than an actual number. The cell address is basically the name of the cell and can be found in the Name Box.
The following example uses actual numbers in the formula in C5.
When a cell address is used as part of a formula, this is called a cell reference. It is called a cell reference because instead of entering specific numbers into a formula, the cell address refers to a specific cell. The following example uses cell references in the formula in C30.
Creating Complex Formulas
Complex Formulas Defined

Simple formulas have one mathematical operation. Complex formulas involve more than one mathematical operation.

Simple Formula: =2+2
Complex Formula: =2+2*8

To calculate complex formulas correctly, you must perform certain operations before others. This is defined in the order of operations.

The order of mathematical operations is very important. If you enter a formula that contains several operations, Excel knows to work those operations in a specific order. The order of operations is:

1. Operations enclosed in
parenthesis
2.
Exponential
calculations (to the power of)
3.
Multiplication and division
, whichever comes first
4.
Addition and subtraction
, whichever comes first

A mnemonic that can help you remember this is Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally (P.E.M.D.A.S).
The Order of Operations
Example 1

Using this order, let us see how the formula 20/(8-4)*8-2 is calculated in the following breakdown:
Example 2

3+3*2=?

Is the answer 12 or 9? Well, if you calculated in the order in which the numbers appear, 3+3*2, you'd get the wrong answer, 12. You must follow the order of operations to get the correct answer.
To Calculate the Correct Answer:

1. Calculate 3*2 first because multiplication comes before addition in the order of operations. The answer is 6.

2. Add the answer obtained in step #1, which is 6, to the number 3 that opened the equation. In other words, add 3 + 6.

3. The answer is 9.
Excel automatically follows a standard order of operations in a complex formula. If you want a certain portion of the formula to be calculated first, put it in parentheses.
Example of How to Write a Complex Formula
:

Click the cell where you want the formula result to appear. In this example, H6.
Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
Type an open parenthesis, or (
Click on the first cell to be included in the formula (G6, for example).
Type the addition sign (+) to let Excel know that an add operation is to be performed.
Click on the second cell in the formula (G7, for example)
Type a close parentheses ).
Type the next mathematical operator, or the division symbol (/) to let Excel know that a division operation is to be performed.
Type an open parenthesis, or (
Click on the third cell to be included in the formula (D6, for example).
Type the addition sign (+) to let Excel know that an add operation is to be performed.
Click on the fourth cell to be included in formula. (D7, for example).
Type a close parentheses ).
Very Important: Press Enter or click the Enter button on the Formula bar. This step ends the formula.

To show fewer decimal places, you can just click the Decrease Decimal place command on the Home tab.
What is an Absolute Reference?
In earlier lessons we saw how cell references in formulas automatically adjust to new locations when the formula is pasted into different cells. This is called a relative reference.
Absolute cell references in a formula always refer to the same cell or cell range in a formula. If a formula is copied to a different location, the absolute reference remains the same.
An absolute reference is designated in the formula by the addition of a dollar sign ($). It can precede the column reference or the row reference, or both. Examples of absolute referencing include:
To Create an Absolute Reference:
Select the cell where you wish to write the formula (in this example, H2)
Type the equal sign (=) to let Excel know a formula is being defined.
Click on the first cell to be included in the formula (F2, for example).
Enter a mathematical operator (use the multiplication symbol for this example).
Click on the second cell in the formula (C2, for example).
Add a $ sign before the C and a $ sign before the 2 to create an absolute reference.
Copy the formula into H3. The new formula should read =F3*$C$2. The F2 reference changed to F3 since it is a relative reference, but C2 remained constant since you created an absolute reference by inserting the dollar signs.
Working with Cells
It is important to know how to move information from one cell to another in Excel. Learning the various ways will save you time and make working with Excel easier. Certain methods are more appropriate depending on how much information you need to move and where it will reside on the spreadsheet. In this lesson you will learn how to cut, copy, and paste, as well as drag and drop information.
To Copy and Paste Cell Contents:

Select the cell or cells you wish to copy.
Click the Copy command in the Clipboard group on the Home tab. The border of the selected cells will change appearance.
Select the cell or cells where you want to paste the information.

Click the Paste command. The copied information will now appear in the new cells.
To select more than one adjoining cell, left-click one of the cells, drag the cursor until all the cells are selected, and release the mouse button.
To Cut and Paste Cell Contents:
Select the cell or cells you wish to cut.
Click the Cut command in the Clipboard group on the Home tab. The border of the selected cells will change appearance.
Select the cell or cells where you want to paste the information.
Click the Paste command. The cut information will be removed from the original cells and now appear in the new cells.

To Drag and Drop Information:
Select the cell or cells you wish to move.
Position your mouse pointer near one of the outside edges of the selected cells. The mouse pointer changes from a large, white cross to a black cross with 4 arrows.
Left-click and hold the mouse button and drag the cells to the new location.
Release the mouse button and the information appears in the new location.
To Use the Fill Handle to Fill Cells:
Position your cursor over the fill handle until the large white cross becomes a thin, black cross.
Left-click your mouse and drag it until all the cells you want to fill are highlighted.
Basic Functions
A function is a predefined formula that performs calculations using specific values in a particular order. While you may think of formulas as being short mathematical equations, like 2 + 2 or F2 * C2, they can actually be very lengthy and involve complex mathematical calculations.
One of the key benefits of functions is that they can save you time since you do not have to write the formula yourself. For example, you could use an Excel function called Average to quickly find the average of a range of numbers or the Sum function to find the sum of a cell range.
The Parts of a Function:
Each function has a specific order, called
syntax
, which must be strictly followed for the function to work correctly.
An example of a function with one argument that adds a range of cells, A3 through A9:
An example of a function with more than one argument that calculates the sum of two cell ranges:
Excel literally has hundreds of different functions to assist with your calculations. Building formulas can be difficult and time-consuming. Excel's functions can save you a lot of time and headaches.
Excel's Different Functions
There are many different functions in Excel 2007. Some of the more common functions include:
Statistical Functions:
• SUM - summation adds a range of cells together.
• AVERAGE - average calculates the average of a range of cells.
• COUNT - counts the number of chosen data in a range of cells.
• MAX - identifies the largest number in a range of cells.
• MIN - identifies the smallest number in a range of cells.
Financial Functions:
• Interest Rates
• Loan Payments
• Depreciation Amounts


Date and Time functions:
• DATE - Converts a serial number to a day of the month
• Day of Week
• DAYS360 - Calculates the number of days between two dates based on a 360-day year
• TIME - Returns the serial number of a particular time
• HOUR - Converts a serial number to an hour
• MINUTE - Converts a serial number to a minute
• TODAY - Returns the serial number of today's date
• MONTH - Converts a serial number to a month
• YEAR - Converts a serial number to a year

You don't have to memorize the functions but should have an idea of what each can do for you.
To Calculate the Sum of a Range of Data Using AutoSum:
• Select the Formulas tab.
• Locate the Function Library group. From here, you can access all the available functions.
• Select the cell where you want the function to appear. In this example, select G42.
• Select the drop-down arrow next to the AutoSum command.
• Select Sum. A formula will appear in the selected cell, G42.

This formula, =SUM(G2:G41), is called a function. AutoSum command automatically selects the range of cells from G2 to G41, based on where you inserted the function. You can alter the cell range, if necessary.

Press the Enter key or Enter button on the formula bar. The total will appear.
To Edit a Function:
• Select the cell where the function is defined.
• Insert the cursor in the formula bar.
• Edit the range by deleting and changing necessary cell numbers.
• Click the
Enter
icon.
To Calculate the Sum of Two Arguments:

• Select the cell where you want the function to appear. In this example, G44.
• Click the Insert Function command on the Formulas tab. A dialog box appears.
• SUM is selected by default.

• Click OK and the Function Arguments dialog box appears so that you can enter the range of cells for the function.
• Insert the cursor in the Number 1 field.
• In the spreadsheet, select the first range of cells. In this example, G21 through G26. The argument appears in the Number 1 field.
• To select the cells, left-click cell G21 and drag the cursor to G26, and then release the mouse button.
• Insert the cursor in the Number 2 field.
• In the spreadsheet, select the second range of cells. In this example, G40 through G41. The argument appears in the Number 2 field.
• Notice that both arguments appear in the function in cell G44 and the formula bar when G44 is selected.
• Click OK in the dialog box and the sum of the two ranges is calculated.
To Calculate the Average of a Range of Data:
• Select the cell where you want the function to appear.
• Click the drop-down arrow next to the AutoSum command.
• Select Average.
• Click on the first cell (in this example, C8) to be included in the formula.
• Left-click and drag the mouse to define a cell range (C8 through cell C20, in this example).
• Click the Enter icon to calculate the average.
Accessing Excel 2007 Functions
To Access Other Functions in Excel:
• Using the point-click-drag method, select a cell range to be included in the formula.
• On the Formulas tab, click on the drop-down part of the AutoSum button.
• If you don't see the function you want to use (Sum, Average, Count, Max, Min), display additional functions by selecting More Functions.
• The Insert Function dialog box opens.
• There are three ways to locate a function in the Insert Function dialog box:
You can type a question in the Search for a function box and click GO, or
You can scroll through the alphabetical list of functions in the Select a function field, or
You can select a function category in the Select a category drop-down list and review the corresponding function names in the Select a function field.

• Select the function you want to use and then click the OK button.
Sorting, Grouping, and Filtering Cells
A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet can contain a great deal of information. With more rows and columns than previous versions, Excel 2007 gives you the ability to analyze and work with an enormous amount of data. To most effectively use this data, you may need to manipulate this data in different ways.

In this lesson, you will learn how to sort, group, and filter data in various ways that will enable you to most effectively and efficiently use spreadsheets to locate and analyze information.
A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet can contain a great deal of information. Sometimes you may find that you need to reorder or sort that information, create groups, or filter information to be able to use it most effectively.
Sorting

Sorting lists
is a common spreadsheet task that allows you to easily reorder your data. The most common type of sorting is alphabetical ordering, which you can do in ascending or descending order.
To Sort in Alphabetical Order:
• Select a cell in the column you want to sort (In this example, we choose a cell in column A).
• Click the Sort & Filter command in the Editing group on the Home tab.
• Select Sort A to Z. Now the information in the Category column is organized in alphabetical order.
You can Sort in reverse alphabetical order by choosing Sort Z to A in the list.
To Sort from Smallest to Largest:
• Select a cell in the column you want to sort (a column with numbers).
• Click the Sort & Filter command in the Editing group on the Home tab.
• Select From Smallest to Largest. Now the information is organized from the smallest to largest amount.
You can sort in
reverse numerical order
by choosing
From Largest to Smallest in the list.
To Sort Multiple Levels:
• Click the Sort & Filter command in the Editing group on the Home tab.
• Select Custom Sort from the list to open the dialog box.
OR
• Select the Data tab.
• Locate the Sort and Filter group.

• Click the Sort command to open the Custom Sort dialog box. From here, you can sort by one item, or multiple items.
• Click the drop-down arrow in the Column Sort by field, and choose one of the options. In this example, Category.
• Choose what to sort on. In this example, we'll leave the default as Value.
• Choose how to order the results. Leave it as A to Z so it is organized alphabetically.
• Click Add Level to add another item to sort by.
• Select an option in the Column Then by field. In this example, we chose Unit Cost.
• Choose what to sort on. In this example, we'll leave the default as Value.
• Choose how to order the results. Leave it as smallest to largest.
• Click OK.
The spreadsheet has been sorted. All the categories are organized in alphabetical order, and within each category, the unit cost is arranged from smallest to largest.

Remember all of the information and data is still here. It's just in a different order.
Grouping Cells Using the Subtotal Command
Grouping is a really useful Excel feature that gives you control over how the information is displayed. You must sort before you can group. In this section we will learn how to create groups using the Subtotal command.
To Create Groups with Subtotals:
• Select any cell with information in it.
• Click the Subtotal command. The information in your spreadsheet is automatically selected and the Subtotal dialog box appears.
• Decide how you want things grouped. In this example, we will organize by Category.
• Select a function. In this example, we will leave the SUM function selected.
• Select the column you want the Subtotal to appear. In this example, Total Cost is selected by default.
• Click OK. The selected cells are organized into groups with subtotals.
To Collapse or Display the Group:
• Click the black minus sign, which is the hide detail icon, to collapse the group.
• Click the black plus sign, which is the show detail icon, to expand the group.
• Use the Show Details and Hide Details commands in the Outline group to collapse and display the group, as well.
To Ungroup Select Cells:

• Select the cells you want to remove from the group.
• Click the Ungroup command.
• Select Ungroup from the list. A dialog box will appear.
• Click OK.

To Ungroup the Entire Worksheet:

• Select all the cells with grouping.
• Click Clear Outline from the menu.
Filtering Cells
Filtering, or temporarily hiding, data in a spreadsheet is very easy. This allows you to focus on specific spreadsheet entries.

To Filter Data:
• Click the Filter command on the Data tab. Drop-down arrows will appear beside each column heading.
• Click the drop-down arrow next to the heading you would like to filter. For example, if you would like to only view data regarding Flavors, click the drop-down arrow next to Category.
• Uncheck Select All.
• Choose Flavor.
• Click OK. All other data will be filtered, or hidden, and only the Flavor data is visible.
To Clear One Filter:
• Select one of the drop-down arrows next to a filtered column.
• Choose Clear Filter From....

To remove all filters, click the Filter command.
Filtering may look a little like grouping, but the difference is that now I can filter on another field, if I want to. For example, let’s say I want to see only the Vanilla-related flavors. I can click the drop-down arrow next to Item, and select Text Filters. From the menu, I’ll choose Contains because I want to find any entry that has the word vanillain it. A dialog box appears. We’ll type Vanilla, and then click OK. Now we can see that the data has been filtered again and that only the Vanilla-related flavors appear.
Worksheets
It is important that you know how to effectively manage your worksheets. By default, three worksheets appear in each new workbook. In this lesson, you will learn how to name, add, delete, group, and ungroup worksheets. Additionally, you will learn how to freeze specific parts of the worksheet so they are always visible.
Naming Worksheets
When you open an Excel workbook, there are three sheets by default and the default name on the tabs are Sheet1, Sheet2 and Sheet3. These are not very informative names. Excel 2007 allows you to define a meaningful name for each worksheet in a workbook so you can quickly locate information.
To Name a Worksheet:
• Right-click the sheet tab to select it.
• Choose Rename from the menu that appears. The text is highlighted by a black box.
• Type a new name for the worksheet.
• Click off the tab. The worksheet now assumes the descriptive name defined.
OR
• Click the Format command in the Cells group on the Home tab.
• Select Rename Sheet. The text is highlighted by a black box.
• Type a new name for the worksheet.
• Click off the tab. The worksheet now assumes the descriptive name defined.
Inserting Worksheets
You can change the default number of sheets that appear by clicking the Microsoft Office Button and choosing Excel Options. You also have the ability to insert new worksheets if needed, while you are working.
To Insert a New Worksheet:
• Left-click the Insert Worksheet icon. A new sheet will appear. It will be named Sheet4, Sheet5 or whatever the next sequential sheet number may be in the workbook.
OR


• Press the Shift and the F11 keys on your keyboard.
Deleting Worksheets
Any worksheet can be deleted from a workbook, including those that have data in it. Remember, a workbook must contain at least one worksheet.

To Delete One or More Worksheets:
• Click on the sheet(s) you want to delete.
• Right-click the sheet(s) and a menu appears.
• Select Delete.
OR

• Select the sheet you want to remove.
• Click the drop-down arrow next to Delete in the Cells group on the Home tab.
• From the menu that appears, select Delete Sheet.
Grouping and Ungrouping Worksheets
A workbook is a multi-page Excel document that contains multiple worksheets. Sometimes you will want to work with the worksheets one at a time as if each is a single unit. Other times, the same information or formatting may need to be added to every worksheet.
Worksheets can be combined together into a group. Grouping worksheets allows you to apply identical formulas and/or formatting across all the worksheets in the group. When you group worksheets, any changes made to one worksheet will also be changed in any other worksheets in the group.
To Group Contiguous Worksheets:
• Select the first sheet you want to group.
• Press and hold the Shift key on your keyboard.
• Click the last sheet you want to group.

• Release the Shift key.
• The sheets are now grouped. All the sheets between the first sheet and last sheet selected are part of the group. The sheet tabs will appear white for the grouped sheets.
• Make any changes to one sheet and the changes will appear in all the grouped sheets.
To Group Non-Contiguous Sheets:
• Select the first sheet you want to group.
• Press and hold the Ctrl key on your keyboard.
• Click the next sheet you want to group.
• Continuing clicking the sheets you want to group.
• Release the Control key.
• The sheets are now grouped. The sheet tabs will appear white for the grouped sheets. Only the sheets selected are part of the group.
• Make any changes to one sheet and the changes will appear in all the grouped sheets.
To Ungroup Worksheets:
• Right-click one of the sheets.
• Select Ungroup from the list.

Charts
A
chart
is a tool you can use in Excel to communicate your data graphically. Charts allow your audience to more easily see the meaning behind the numbers in the spreadsheet, and make showing comparisons and trends a lot easier. In this lesson, you will learn how to insert and modify Excel charts and see how they can be an effective tool for communicating information.
Creating a Chart
Charts can be a useful way to communicate data. When you insert a chart in Excel, it appears in the selected worksheet with the source data, by default.
To Create a Chart:
• Select the worksheet you want to work with. In this example, we use the Summary worksheet.
• Select the cells that you want to chart, including the column titles and the row labels.
• Click the Insert tab.
• Hover over each Chart option in the Charts group to learn more about it.
• Select one of the Chart options. In this example, we use the Columns command.
• Select a type of chart from the list that appears. For this example, we use a 2-D Clustered Column. The chart appears in the worksheet.
Identifying the Parts of a Chart
Have you ever read something you didn't fully understand but when you saw a chart or graph, the concept became clear and understandable? Charts are a visual representation of data in a worksheet. Charts make it easy to see comparisons, patterns, and trends in the data.
Source Data
The range of cells that make up a chart. The chart is updated automatically whenever the information in these cells change.

Title
The title of the chart.

Legend
The chart key, which identifies each color on the chart represents.

Axis
The vertical and horizontal parts of a chart. The vertical axis is often referred to as the Y axis, and the horizontal axis is referred to as the X axis.

Data Series
The actual charted values, usually rows or columns of the source data.

Value Axis
The axis that represents the values or units of the source data.

Category Axis
The axis identifying each data series.

Chart Tools
Once you insert a chart, a new set of Chart Tools, arranged into 3 tabs, will appear above the Ribbon. These are only visible when the chart is selected.
• Select another chart type.
• Click OK.

The chart in the example compares each salesperson's monthly sales to his/her other month's sales; however you can change what is being compared. Just click the Switch Row/Column Data command, which will rotate the data displayed on the x and y axes. To return to the original view, click the Switch Row/Column command again.

To Change Chart Layout:

• Select the Design tab.
• Locate the Chart Layouts group.
• Click the More arrow to view all your layout options.

• Left-click a layout to select it.

If your new layout includes chart titles, axes, or legend labels, just insert your cursor into the text and begin typing to add your own text.

To Change Chart Style:

• Select the Design tab.
• Locate the Chart Style group.
• Click the More arrow to view all your style options.
• Left-click a style to select it.

To Move the Chart to a Different Worksheet:

• Select the Design tab.
• Click the Move Chart command. A dialog box appears. The current location of the chart is selected.
• Select the desired location for the chart (i.e., choose an existing worksheet, or select New Sheet and name it).

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Microsoft Office Excel 2007 Tutorial
Microsoft Office
2007

Save As allows you to name the file and choose a location to save the spreadsheet. Choose Save As if you'd like to save the file for the first time or if you'd like to save the file as a different name.
Select Save if the file has already been named.
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