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Sentence Fluency

Students are introduced to sentence variety structures (includes beginning with adjs, advs, participial phrases, etc)
by

Abby Sanderson

on 10 February 2014

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Transcript of Sentence Fluency

How much fun would longboarding, inline skating, or biking be if you had to stop and restart every five feet?
Good writing needs to keep rolling along, too. Periods should signal a smooth, gradual stop— not a slam-on-the-brakes interruption.
To find out whether you’re giving your readers a smooth ride, read your writing aloud, every word and sentence. If it doesn’t flow well for you, it’s time to revise.
Sentence Fluency
1. Use an -ing word (participial phrase)

2. Use an -ly word (adverb)

3. Use an adjective

4. Use an appositive

5. N2SSWTSW

6. Use compound sentences
How can I improve my sentence fluency?
The child pulled the fire alarm.
Standing on his tip-toes, the curious kindergartner reached for the alarm and snagged it.

The kid went to Mr. Haberman's office.
Sweating profusely, Tony Rebel trudged reluctantly into Mr. Haberman's office.

The girls talked at the locker
.
Snickering wickedly, the teenage she-devils gossiped at their lockers.
Use an -ing word
(participial phrase)
He dialed her number.
Nervously, Eddie slowly punched in the digits on his phone.

The kids left the building on the last day.
Gleefully, students rushed out the seventh grade wing into the blinding daylight.

The dog ate his food.
Ravenously, the skinny stray scarfed down the dry kibble
Use an -ly word
(adverb)
The substitute entered the classroom.
Anxious and fearful, Mr. Cranberry stumbled into the seventh grade class.

Sophie left the gym after cheerleading tryouts.
Infuriated and humiliated, Sophie bolted from cheerleading tryouts, the gym doors slamming behind her.
Use adjectives
A wacky mathematician, Mrs. Cargill is my algebra teacher.

My first car, a Pontiac station wagon with fake wood paneling, was the laughing stock of the high school parking lot.

My dad, a Sioux Falls police officer, took me on a stakeout last Friday.

An international best-seller, The Call of the Wild, will be our last literature unit this year.

My mom, a near dictator, has grounded me again.
Use Appositives (nouns)
Now, let's practice!
1. __________________________________, my mom stomped out of the kitchen.

2. _________________________________________, I climbed the tree with ease.

3. Jeff, __________________________, accepted the Student of the Month award.

4. I put on my warmest clothes, ________________________________________.
Now, let's practice!
1. _____________________, I walked to the empty stage with my heart pounding in my chest.

2. __________________, Josie handed her final test to Mrs. Kallas.

3. My brother __________________ crept down the dark stairwell.

4. I presented my project on endangered animals to the class ________________________.
Now, let's practice!
1. ___________and_______________, I snuggled under the covers after a long day.

2. ______________and______________, Mrs. Ailts finished the marathon in record time!
Now, let's practice!
1. Mary, ____________________ made the final decision.

2. My dream car, ________________________ is finally marked down!

3. Billy, __________________, scored the winning goal!
Works Cited
Charnon-Deutsch, Lou. The Nineteenth Story Spanish Story. London: Tamesis Limited, 1985. Google Books. Web. <http://http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=lang_en&id=wHduVXA7ptIC&oi=fnd&pg=PA13&dq=%22las+medias+rojas%22&ots=D1F0n-FE91&sig=ftfQlMw-j4huHxfSfp_gDaU4uOk#v=onepage&q=las%20medias%20rojas&f=false>.
Iglesias, Christina. "A Nicely Polished Looking-Glass." Google. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2011. <http://74.125.155.132/scholar?q=cache:KhGLOgsMaW4J:scholar.google.com/+detachment+in+%22las+medias+rojas%22&hl=en&as_sdt=0,42>.
Richter, David H. The Critical Tradition: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2007. Print.
Virgillo, Carmelo, L. Teresa. Valdivieso, and Edward H. Friedman. Aproximaciones Al Estudio De La Literatura Hispa%u0301nica. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2008. Print.
Wilson, Katharina M. "Emilia Pardo Bazan." Google Books/ An Encylopedia of Continental Women. N.p., n.d. Web. 07 Feb. 2011. <http://books.google.com/books?id=2Wf1SVbGFg8C&pg=PA95&dq=naturalism+feminism+emilia+pardo+bazan&hl=en&ei=pIlQTcj6B9PUgAel_pg-&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=naturalism%20feminism%20emilia%20pardo%20bazan&f=false>.
Full transcript