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Rhetorical Strategies to the Declaration of Independence

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Yasmeen Deonarain

on 29 October 2014

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Transcript of Rhetorical Strategies to the Declaration of Independence


1.)Alliteration
"....Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty....."(Jefferson 23-24).
This is an example of alliteration, because it has an occurrence with the letter (d).
2.)Hyperbole
" He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither "swarms" of officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance"(Jefferson 61-62).
This is an example of hyperbole, because he over exaggerated the word "swarms of officers" usually when you say swarms, it is 1,000 or more.

3.) Metaphor
"A prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people"(Jefferson 104-105).
This is an example of metaphor, because he is saying the "Prince" someone who is high like the British. Also saying "By every act which may act which may define a Tyrant" basically an cruel oppressor.

4.) Metonymy
"..... That they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British crown..."(Jefferson 124-125)
This is an example of Metonymy, because "crown is a substitution for the ruler, king, or high person.
5.) Anaphora
Anaphora is used a lot in the declaration of independence. Textual Evidence "He has refused his assent to laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good" (Jefferson 32-33)
"He has forbidden his governors...."(Jefferson 34)
"....He has utterly neglected to attend them"(Jefferson 36-37)
The meaning of Anaphora is the repetition of a word or phrase.
Metonymy

Tone of the declaration of independence
The tone of the Declaration of Independence is rebellious, because Thomas Jefferson is stating everything that has been wrong. He is telling us what we should fight for, why we should fight, and as people we deserve better. He is also stating that we have been playing this game nice, and we are being fair it has gotten us no where. So we should fight for our rights, and stand up in order to achieve what we want/ deserve.
Tone
Connotation of Declaration of Independence.
The connotation of the Declaration of Independence is "In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated petitions have been answered only by a repeated injury"(Jefferson 102-104). This is telling us the negativity, and how long they have been waiting for peace, their rights, and in order to get what they want they have to fight for it, be heard and be seen.
Connotation
Rhetorical Strategies to the Declaration of Independence
Argumentative Speech
Our group's argumentative speech is about people fighting for their freedom and that if anyone tries to take it from them then they should right for their freedom. We claim that if people don't fight for their freedom they'll have a harsh and unfair life. We believe that everyone should fight for their freedom if anyone tries to take it from them. If people don't fight for their freedom when someone tries to take it then they won't be treated fairly and slavery might even start again since people aren't trying to fight for their rights. Someone wouldn't be able to do what he or she
wanted to do throughout his or her life since they don't have any any freedom compared to someone who has freedom and is free to do what he or she wants and also being treated fairly. Everyone is born equal so no one should have advantages over another person. Let's refer back to the United States "dark history"(starting around the year 1,789) when African Americans have no types of rights or freedom and they were being treated very harshly. Our counter argument is that if anyone actually supports someone taking another person's freedom then he or she should get his or her freedom taken away instead and see how it feels like without being treated fairly and let that person reconsider his or her choice. Another counter argument is that if someone supports taking a person's freedom then that "someone" should be traded into slavery and see how it feels like without any type of rights. Taking away people's freedom is wrong since something bad will most likely result from it, such as slavery. The United States "dark history" has already proved that taking away people's freedom will result in cruelty and corruption of people.

1) "...[T]o dissolve the politcal boundaries which have connected them with another, and to assume, among the powers of the earth,..."(Jefferson 1-7). Jefferson uses parallelism to by using the adjetives "dissolve" and "assume" to describe how humans use different forms of government to control people.

2) "...[I]t is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security"(Jefferson 22-25). Using parellelism, Jefferson explains that they have the right to throw off the British government and to start a new one to establish a better future security.

3) "He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people"(Jefferson 88-89). Jefferson uses parallelism by using verbs to show Great Britain abused them to persuade the people why they shoud rebell and fight for their freedom.

4) "They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity"(Jefferson 115-16). Jefferson explains how Britain is deaf for his and the peoples cry for justice while being under Britain's control.

5) "Free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, and ought to be, totally dissolved, and that, as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do"(Jefferson 124-30). Jefferson persuades the audience to that because they are free they have the right to do things such as make alliances and levy cars.
Parallelism
Argumentative Speech

Theme
The theme of the passage is that everyone is equal."We hold these truths to be self-evident: - That all men are created equal: that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights"(Jefferson 8-10). The author want the readers to know that everyone is created equal and if anyone tries to take his or her rights he or she should fight for it. The author persuasive the readers by listing how unfair the government is. "He has made judges dependent on his will alone for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries; He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of offices to harass our people and eat out their substance"(Jefferson 59-62).
Style
Aphorism
Aphorism is a terse saying the general truth. The author states what's wrong with the government's action and how the people under the government's control warned the government about it's action. "We have appealed to their native justice and imagination and we have argued them, by using the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpation's, which would inevitably interrupt our communication and correspondence."(Jefferson 110-114).
The author tends to start off every sentence with "He has" to show that he is referring to one person and everything that he is talking about refers to "him". Basically the author use repetition. "He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of immediate and pressing importance unless suspended in their operation till his assent should be detained; and, when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them"(Jefferson 32-37). The author starts off every sentence with "He has" to show that he's talking about the government and the bad things that the author stated were all done by the government. The author persuasive the reader's by repeating "He has" to show passionate he is to exposed the unfairness of the government and how everything is the government's fault. "He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people; He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation.
Syntax
"We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness"(Jefferson 8-10). Jefferson uses syntax in his quotes to explain to the audience that all men are created and that they have equal and unlimited rights. He uses subject, verb, object in "All men are created equal".
Using Rhetorical Devices:
Declaration of Independence

Exit Ticket
What do you think the theme in the Declaration of Independence is in your own words?
Full transcript