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The Silk Road

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Nezaket Özgirin

on 22 December 2015

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Transcript of The Silk Road

What?
The Silk Road /network of trade routes across the Asian continent

*connected East, South, and Western Asia with the Mediterranean world, as well as North and Northeast Africa and Europe.

*important paths for cultural, commercial, and technological exchange between traders, merchants, pilgrims, missionaries, soldiers, nomads and urban dwellers from Ancient China, Ancient India, Ancient Tibet, Persian Empire and Mediterranean countries for almost 3,000 years.[5]

* name from Chinese silk trade from the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 CE).
Chan Ch'ien, the first known Chinese traveler to make contact with the Central Asian tribes, later came up with the idea to expand the silk trade to include these lesser tribes and therefore forge alliances with these Central Asian nomads. Because of this idea, the Silk Road was born.

The Silk Road's Decline



By 760 AD, during the T'ang Dynasty, trade along the Silk Road had declined. It revived tremendously under the Sung Dynasty in the eleventh and twelfth centuries when China became largely dependent on its silk trade. In addition, trade to Central and Western Asia as well as Europe recovered for a period of time from 1276-1368 under the Yuan Dynasty when the Mongols controlled China. The Chinese traded silk for medicines, perfumes, and slaves in addition to precious stones. As overland trade became increasingly dangerous, and overseas trade became more popular, trade along the Silk Road declined. While the Chinese did maintain a silk-fur trade with the Russians north of the original Silk Route, by the end of the fourteenth century, trade and travel along the road had decreased.


The route grew with the rise of the Roman Empire because the Chinese initially gave silk to the Roman-Asian governments as gifts.
The 7000 mile route spanned China, Central Asia, Northern India, and the Parthian and Roman Empires. It connected the Yellow River Valley to the Mediterranean Sea and passed through places such as Chinese cities Kansu and Sinkiang and present-day countries Iran, Iraq and Syria.



Northwestern Indians who lived near the Ganges River played prominent roles as middlemen in the China-Mediterranean silk trade because as early as the third century AD, they understood that silk was a lucrative product of the Chinese Empire. The trading relationship between the Chinese and the Indians grew stronger with increased Han expansion into Central Asia. The Chinese would trade their silk with the Indians for precious stones and metals such as jade, gold, and silver, and the Indians would trade the silk with the Roman Empire. Silk proved to be an expensive import for the Roman Empire since its trade across Indian and Central Asia was heavily controlled by the Parthian Empire.

Social Consequences of the Silk Road



While the Chinese silk trade played a minor role in the Chinese economy, it did increase the number of foreign merchants present in China under the Han Dynasty, exposing both the Chinese and visitors to their country to different cultures and religions. In fact, Buddhism spread from India to China because of trade along the Silk Route, similar to the way Islam spread along trans-Saharan routes in medieval West Africa. .
Target Concepts
•The rise of the Silk Road and its importance for cultural diffusion
•The prospects for tourism in Central Asia
Target vocabulary:
assume
confrontation
customary
declaration
diffusion
disintegrated
dominate
economic
flourish
goods joint
land(s)
magnificent
peak
pilgrim
political
region strategic
successor
territory
unspoiled
religion
The Silk Road & Diseases
General info about the countries
Your Project??
History
quia links
http://www.quia.com/servlets/quia.activities.common.ActivityPlayer?AP_rand=1836740073&AP_activityType=1&AP_urlId=1106573&gameType=list
http://www.quia.com/quiz/1036069.html?AP_rand=116242647
Originally, the Chinese trade silk internally, within the empire. Caravans from the empire's interior would carry silk to the western edges of the region. Often small Central Asian tribes would attack these caravans hoping to capture the traders' valuable commodities. As a result, the Han Dynasty extended its military defenses further into Central Asia from 135 to 90 BC in order to protect these caravans.
Extra information
The Silk Road
Extra listening: Podcast
ANSWER KEY


1. What does the speaker say about Marco Polo’s visit to the Silk Road?
Some people don’t believe it. No evidence

2. What is Dr Wood’s book about?
The origins of silk road

3. What was being carried on the Silk Road?
Silk, wool, jewellery,

4. What is interesting about the centre of the Silk Road?
Lovely strings of oasis surrounded by poplar trees, both hot and cold, not just sand.

5. Why is jade so important for the Chinese? Who uses it more often?
Magical material for them / represents yin-yang // women

6. In which European city was already familiar with silk?
Rome

7. Who produced silk in China? Where was it produced?
Women // at home

8. What was the Emperor’s concubine like in the 8th century? What happened to her?
She was fat unlike the women of the time // had a love affair with the emperor and was strangled

9. What is interesting and exotic about the Silk Road and the East for the Europeans according to the Wood?
Oriental objects, huris, cushions, beyond everyday life, women

10. Who went there in the 1920s and the 30s?
Women missionaries (safe for women)

While Listening. THE SILK ROAD

Click on the link below to listen to the interview with Dr Frances Wood.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour/2002_29_tue_01.shtml

The Silk Road conjures up images of exoticism and far flung places, but what is the reality.
Dr Frances Wood is Curator of the Chinese collections at the British Library where there is a huge collection of documents and writings from the Silk Road. Frances joins Jenni to talk about her new book The Silk Road.

Vocabulary: Study the words from the listening.

1. What does the speaker say about Marco Polo’s visit to the Silk Road?


2. What is Dr Wood’s book about?


3. What was being carried on the Silk Road?


4. What is interesting about the centre of the Silk Road?


5. Why is jade so important for the Chinese? Who uses it more often?


6. Which European city was already familiar with silk?


7. Who produced silk in China? Where was it produced?


8. What was the Emperor’s concubine like in the 8th century? What happened to her?


9. What is interesting and exotic about the Silk Road and the East for the Europeans according to Wood?


10. Who went there in the 1920s and the 30s?

Aim: To prepare a presentation about a different aspect of the Silk Road. Please read your section on pp 12-15 in BB3 and summarize the most important parts in your presentation. You can support your presentation with the ideas in the livebinders below.
You can use the following links to get ideas
http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=29502
http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=277279
http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=830272
Full transcript