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Modernism (1900-1980)

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Angela Houghton

on 25 October 2013

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Transcript of Modernism (1900-1980)

Modernism (1900-1980)
Angela Houghton
ART 101 Art Appreciation
Instructor Marc McGrath
October 28, 2013

Modernism (1900-1980)
This art movement started in the late 19th century, capturing the finer feelings of the period. According to Kleiner (2014), "Modernist art goes beyond simply dealing with the present and involves the artist's critical examination of premises of art itself" (glossary). According to Wang (2012), "In the late 1905's to 1960s was accompanied by a shift in ascendance from North American cultural and literacy circles to European intellectual and philosophical ones" (p. 619). This gallery is a contribution to different Modern African American artist from 1900-1980! Each culture was effected differently during the time of Modernism, and you can truly see it in African American work. These artist give a sense of freedom, expression, and feelings, based on the stereotyping and their encounters.
"Beale Street Blues,"
By. Palmer Hayden, (1943)
"Beale Street Blues, is a period style painting that represents the ordinary aspects of the black experience with in the African American culture. This artwork is oil on canvas, and Palmer used many hues of and tonality of complementary colors. Even to the skins tones of the African American people in the painting, they are all different hues of black and brown. You can truly sense the expression of happiness based on movement of the people on Beale Street.
Hayden, J.(1943) "Beale Street Blues." [Oil on Canvas]. Retrieved from http://maaala.org/palmerhayden.html
Fishermen's Wives (1945)
Wilson, E. (1945). "Fishermen's Wives," [Oil on canvas; 35.5" X 46.5"]. Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.ket.org/elliswilson/wives.htm
The personification of this piece of art is clear; living by any means necessary, these women were gathering the fish that their husbands caught. With the use of subtractive lighting and the use complementary colors that absorb and reflect each other to create this perspective of night time.
Into Bondage (1936)
By. Aaron Dougulas
Oil on canvas,, this piece of art tells the story of a man entering into bondage; during this time the African American were dealing with a great deal of bondage. To create the illusion of a deep landscape Aaron employed perspective, by reducing the size of and blurring the most distant form.
Dougulas, A. (1936). "Into Bondage." [Oil on canvas; 153.4 X 153.7 cm]. Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.iniva.org/harlem/aaron.html
John Biggers is the artist of this tempera and oil on canvas, it gives the perspective that many already have about African American communities. According to "American Art" (n.d.), "Shotgun, Third Ward depicts a scene from Houston's predominantly African American Third Ward community where Biggers lived" (para. 8). This community is one that still strong today.
Shotgun Third Ward #1 (1966)
Some museums have an issue with new techniques; according to Paul (2012), "It is argued that the immaterial qualities of new media and digital art cannot and should not be separated from the material components of the medium." (Abstract). Alma used lozenge-shaped brushstrokes arranged in long bands or dense, puzzle like patterns, with acrylic complementary colors, (National Museum of Women in the Arts, n.d.). The colors and title depict a landscape subject, with the perspective of a field of different flowers.
Iris, Tulips, Jonquils, and Crocuses, 1969,
By. Alma Woodsey Thomas
Thomas, A. (1969). [Acrylic on canvas, 60 X 50 in].Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay. Retrieved from http://www.nmwa.org/works/iris-tulips-jonquils-and-crocuses
Biggers, J. (1966). "Shotgun, Third Ward # 1" [Tempera and Oil on canvas; 30 X 48 in]. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved from http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/highlights/artworks.cfm?id=AA&StartRow=6
Liberation of Aunt Jemima, 1972
By: Betye Saar
This is an mixed media assemblage, it is 11.6" x 7.9" x 2.5. This artist mixed shaping materials, complementary colors, and the texture of cotton to give you the sense of the courage and work of african american race in this piece during this era. Though many laws against racism had been passed there was still issues. She was not only the caregiver, but the rifle represents the courage.
Saar, B. (1972). "Liberation of Aunt Jemima" [Mixed media, 11.6" x 7.9" x 2.5"]. Retrieved from http://www.netropolitan.org/saar/auntjemima.html
American Art. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://americanart.si.edu/search/artist_bio.cfm?ID=414
Biggers, J. (1966). "Shotgun, Third Ward # 1" [Tempera and Oil on canvas; 30 X 48 in]. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved from http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/online/highlights/artworks.cfm?id=AA&StartRow=6
Dougulas, A. (1936). "Into Bondage." [Oil on canvas; 153.4 X 153.7 cm]. Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.iniva.org/harlem/aaron.html
Kleiner, F. (2014). Gardner’s Art through the Ages: The Western Perspective (14th ed). Boston, MA. Wadsworth
Hayden, J.(1943) "Beale Street Blues." [Oil on Canvas]. Retrieved from http://maaala.org/palmerhayden.html
Paul, C. The myth of immateriality – presenting new media art. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research, 10(2/3), 167-172. doi: 10.1386/tear.10.2-3.167_7
Saar, B. (1972). "Liberation of Aunt Jemima" [Mixed media, 11.6" x 7.9" x 2.5"]. Retrieved from http://www.netropolitan.org/saar/auntjemima.html
Thomas, A. (1969). [Acrylic on canvas, 60 X 50 in].Gift of Wallace and Wilhelmina Holladay. Retrieved from http://www.nmwa.org/works/iris-tulips-jonquils-and-crocuses
Wang, N. (2012). Multiplied modernities and modernisms? Literature Compass, 9(9), 617-619. doi: 10.111/lic3.12006.
Wilson, E. (1945). "Fishermen's Wives," [Oil on canvas; 35.5" X 46.5"]. Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://www.ket.org/elliswilson/wives.htm

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