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RESEARCH ON CHINESE AMERICAN LIFE IN THE MID-20TH CENTURY

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Mauro Aguayo

on 6 October 2014

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Transcript of RESEARCH ON CHINESE AMERICAN LIFE IN THE MID-20TH CENTURY

RESEARCH ON CHINESE AMERICAN LIFE IN THE MID-20TH CENTURY
chinese immigrants
From 1882 to 1943 the United States Government severely curtailed immigration from China to the United States. This Federal policy resulted from concern over the large numbers of Chinese who had come to the United States in response to the need for inexpensive labor, especially for construction of the transcontinental railroad. Competition with American workers and a growing nativism brought pressure for restrictive action, which began with the Act of May 6, 1882 (22 Stat. 58).
history of chinese americans
The history of Chinese Americans or the history of ethnic Chinese in the United States relates to the three major waves of Chinese immigration to the United States with the first beginning in the 19th century. Chinese immigrants in the 19th century worked as laborers, particularly on the transcontinental railroad, such as the Central Pacific Railroad. They also worked as laborers in the mining industry, and suffered racial discrimination at every level of society. While industrial employers were eager to get this new and cheap labor, the ordinary white public was stirred to anger by the presence of this "yellow peril". Despite the provisions for equal treatment of Chinese immigrants in the 1868 Burlingame Treaty, political and labor organizations rallied against the immigration of what they regarded as a degraded race and "cheap Chinese labor".
young ages
life for the kids
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