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Plot Components and Characterization

Lesson 11/3-11/17
by

Barbara DiBlasi

on 30 November 2015

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Transcript of Plot Components and Characterization

Who? What? Where? When? Why?
The author begins his or her story with the exposition. It establishes the setting, introduces some of the main characters, explains background, and introduces the characters’ main conflict.



As you view this video clip,
identify the setting, main
characters, and conflicts.
Exposition
The series of events, such as the conflicts, complications, and struggles, that lead to the climax, or the highest point of action in the story.
Rising Action
Plot Diagram
4
3
2
5
1
A struggle between a
character and another
physical force, such
as another character
or a natural disaster.
External Conflict
Man versus self
Man versus society
Conflict - A struggle between two opposing forces
Internal Conflict
A mental or emotional struggle that occurs within a character.
Complication/Conflict
1. What is Cinderella’s initial conflict?
2. How does she try to resolve it?
How does her effort complicate the
situation even more?
This is the second component of plot. Here, characters take some action to resolve conflict but are instead met with more problems such as danger, hostility, fear, or even a new threatening situation.
This is the third part of a story. It is the tense, exciting, or terrifying moment when the reader’s emotional involvement is greatest. It is the point of the story where the action comes to a peak. It might be the turning point of the story. All earlier action leads up to the climax (called the rising action), and all following action fades (called the falling action).
Climax
What clues hint that this is the
highest point of the story’s action?
Climax - From Walt Disney’s Cinderella
The events that follow the story’s climax. These events lead to the story’s resolution.
Falling Action
Man versus nature
Man versus man
Man versus nature
Hint: Think about the change in music
and the facial expressions of the characters
in the scene.
This happens at the end of the story when all struggles and conflicts have been resolved and we know what is going to happen to the people in the story.
Resolution/Denouement
This should be a great review
of last week's lesson...
As you view the rest
of this clip, try to identify
both the falling action
and the denouement.
Character &
Characterization

Types of character:
Flat
Round
Static
Dynamic
A character who does not change/evolve over the course of the narrative.
A character who undergoes change over the course of the narrative.
A character who is characterized enough to seem real or life-like.
An author can achieve this
through use of:
-Dialogue
-Description
The character's change is often prompted by a lesson that they were forced to learn in order to resolve a major conflict.
A character who is not developed
or characterized enough to seem
"real" or life-like.
A struggle between a character and another physical force, such as another character or a natural disaster.
External Conflict
Internal Conflict
A mental or emotional struggle that occurs within a character.
Other examples of internal conflicts:
How does the author
enhance the
climax?

The feeling of uncertainty or anxiety, which an author instills in a reader, as he/she questions the outcome of events.
SUSPENSE!
How does an AUTHOR create it?!
Pacing:
Speeding up the action.
Foreshadowing
: Giving hints or clues as to what might happen later.
Dangerous actions or events
: Having a main character face bodily harm, firsthand.
As you watch this next clip. Take note of how the suspense is created. Does the director use foreshadowing, dangerous actions/events, pacing, or all three?
Isn't it Ironic, Don't Ya Think?
Verbal Irony
Situational Irony
Dramatic Irony
(Saracasm) When a character says
one thing but means another.
This occurs when the reader's
expectations are not met by the reality.

We expect one thing to happen and often
the exact opposite occurs in reality.
This occurs when the audience knows something that characters in the story do not know.
While watching this clip,
answer the following:
1. What does the character say?
2. What does the character mean?
While watching this clip,
answer the following:
1. What do we expect?
2. What actually happens?
While watching this clip,
answer the following:
1. What do we know that the character does not know?
Full transcript