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Y11 Brothers, Manhunt, Sonnet 116, Hour, Praise Song, Born Yesterday, To His Coy Mistress, Sonnet 43, Ghazal

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Eva Janoskova

on 20 January 2016

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Transcript of Y11 Brothers, Manhunt, Sonnet 116, Hour, Praise Song, Born Yesterday, To His Coy Mistress, Sonnet 43, Ghazal

MY BIG FAT POETRY RECAP
Sonnet 116
8. 'It's pointing south' is an ...
9. 'How many lines in a sonnet?
10. Persian form of poetry is...
11. .... is when a sentence continues over
a line break.
12. If a poem is lyrical, it doesn't have a...
13. A

posh word for exaggeration is...
14. Carpe diem means...
15. A

cluster of words relating to the
same topic is called a.... field
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
Comparisons with other poems:
???
Born Yesterday

For Sally Amis

Tightly-folded bud,
I have wished you something
None of the others would:
Not the usual stuff
About being beautiful,
Or running off a spring
Of innocence and love —
They will all wish you that,
And should it prove possible,
Well, you’re a lucky girl.
But if it shouldn’t, then
May you be ordinary;
Have, like other women,
An average of talents:
Not
ugly,
not
good-looking,
Nothing

un
customary
To pull you off your balance,
That,
unworkable
itself,
Stops all the rest from
working
.
In fact, may you be dull —
If that is what a
skilled,
Vigilant, flexible,
Unemphasised, enthralled
Catching of happiness is called.
polyptoton
repetition of negatives
contrast
cynical
Why a quintet of adjectives?
Form
- no rhyme scheme (spoken English) = no pathos
extra emphasis on the final rhyming couplet

Structure
- 1st stanza: cynical and ironic
- 2nd stanza: empathic and positive

Meaning: themes: cynicism (sod fairy tales!)
tenderness and care
realism

Imagery - sarcastic mockery of cliched images
- happiness

Language: - skeptical and cynical
- significant adjectives
How would you pair them up. Why?
Sonnet 116
Quickdraw
The Farmer's Bride
How do I love thee?
Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and Ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of every day's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost Saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
3D love
When my soul feels its way into the spiritual realm to find the goal of being alive and living uprightly
Anaphora
Why 'thee'
and not 'you'?
sestet
octave
Form:
traditional Petrarchan sonnet (octave
abbaabba
+ sestet
cdcdcd
)
- fairly regular rhyme scheme but imperfect flexible: assonance ("Praise" and "Faith" - imperfect rhyme)
- the poem is about defining the perfect love, and yet the poem avoids perfection

Structure:
Octave:
intensity of love
Sestet:
history and childhood - she loves him with the emotions of her ENTIRE life

Meaning:
themes of eternal and unselfish love,
moral virtue
Sonnet 43 versus...
To His Coy Mistress
(love beyond grave?)
Ghazal
(OTT love?)
Sonnet 43
(eternal love?)
Hour
(is time the enemy of love?)
You were
water to me
deep and bold and fathoming

You were
moon’s eye to me
pull and grained and mantling

You were
sunrise to me
rise and warm and streaming

You were
the fishes red gill to me
the flame tree’s spread to me
the crab’s leg/the fried plantain smell
replenishing replenishing

Go to your wide futures, you said
Form:
First three stanzas = identical patterns, layout resembles the ebb and flow of the sea
Enjambments and no rhythm or rhyme - ideas merge into one

Structure:
Each stanza presents a different image but without punctuation all images merge into ONE
not one experience - combo of many years

Meaning:
familial bonds, childhood memories

Imagery:
earthly elements and food

Language:
not formulaic or traditional form

appeal to senses
Turn Sonnet 116 and Born Yesterday Into MEMEs
Grade Approximations
35-40 A*
31 - 34 A
26 - 30 B
21 - 25 C
16 - 20 D
11 - 15 E
7 - 10 F
3 - 6 G
Band 5:
33 - 40

Band 4:
25 - 32

Band 3:
17 - 24

Band 2:
9 - 16

Band 1:
1-8

O marks:
nothing worthy of credit
What is the theme of this poem?
Hour

Love’s time’s beggar
, but even a single hour,
bright as a
dropped
coin, makes love rich.
We find an hour together,
spend
it not on flowers
or wine, but the whole of the summer sky and a grass ditch.

For
thousands of seconds
we kiss; your hair
like treasure
on the ground; the Midas light
turning your limbs to gold.
Time slows
, for here
we are millionaires,
backhanding
the night

so nothing
dark
will end our
shining
hour,
no jewel hold a candle to the cuckoo spit
hung from the blade of grass at your ear,
no chandelier or spotlight see you better lit

than here. Now. Time hates love, wants love poor,
but love spins
gold, gold, gold
from straw.
Is this a sonnet?

14 lines
themes
closed quatrains with no enjambments in between
final rhyming couplet with a volta
syllables of equal length
Design a question for 'Hour' that could come up in the exam.

What poem would you compare 'Hour' with?
How much can you remember about Hour?
Structure
- regular rhyme scheme: sense of order, completeness and perfection (like the key theme = LOVE!)

Form
- same idea in each quatrain through different imagery
volta: speaker's promise/guarantee

Themes -
devotion, permanence, constancy, true love

Imagery
- Love is an even-fixed mark, a star, Time personified

Language
- semantic fields of love, geography, change
SONNET 116
Form
- features of a Shakespearean sonnet but varied line lengths, rhyme patterns and enjambments between stanza
pastiche

Structure
- personification of love and time mixed with memories of a specific afternoon; final line is made up of monosyllabic words - direct end to a dreamy poem

Meaning: themes: carpe diem, timelessness, physical pleasure

Imagery - Love and Time personified, references to fairy tales and myths

Language: overlap between semantic fields of love, time and money
HOUR
Pair them up!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
7.
6.
Sheffield Wednesday!
8.
9.
To His Coy Mistress
Sister Maude
Hour vs Sonnet 116:
The relationship between time and love

Quickdraw vs In Paris With You:
Dysfunctional relationships

Nettles vs Harmonium:
Difficult parent-child relationship

The Manhunt vs Farmer's Bride:
Dysfunctional marriage
AO1
Use textual detail and interpret
AO2
Explain how language, structure and form contribute to writers’ presentation of ideas and themes
AO3
Make comparisons
AO4
Relate texts to their social, cultural and historical contexts
Grade Approximations
58-80 A*
53-57 A
48-52 B
43-47 C
38-42 D
33-37 E
28-32 F
23-27 G
Sonnet 116
Hour
Quickdraw
In Paris With You
Farmer's Bride
The Manhunt
Nettles
Harmonium
Examiner's Report:
Underline the key points
Which one is the odd one out? Why?

OR
OR
OR
OR
Which words suggest that this poem is very private and only concerns two people?
Which words imply that it looks at the past?
Which words appeal to the reader's senses?
What semantic fields can you find?
Watch the video and make a mental note of the context - what does the author reveal about the poem?
And the poem?
What do they have in comm
What do these have in common?
Justin Case
Polly Esther
Elle Fant
Mary Zarse
Etta Lott
Don Key
Tom Tom
Seymour Butt
Don’t cake your face in make-up
.
Adultery will bring you a world of misery
Always look your best

Don’t take the first offer you get
Make him wait
Wear floor-length dresses that show a hint of cleavage
Attitudes towards women in 17th century England
"Her breasts are the soft pillows of love."
"Her breasts are two ivory balls of listing pleasure".
"Her breasts are meadows where lilies grow".
"Her breasts are a pair of maiden-unconquered worlds“.
IS THERE A RECURRING THEME HERE???
Chat-up lines from 17th century men…
What’s the message of the poem?

Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love's day;
Thou by the Indian Ganges' side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood;
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires, and more slow.
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found,
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long preserv'd virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust.
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none I think do there embrace.

Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may;
And now, like am'rous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour,
Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power.
Let us roll all our strength, and all
Our sweetness, up into one ball;
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Through the iron gates of life.
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.

FORM
Dramatic monologue (no access to mistress' voice)

Rhyming couplets make the speaker's arguments sound convincing and plausible (but perhaps rehearsed)
Couplets reflect the couple and their intimacy
STRUCTURE
Traditional argument:
1st stanza - IF
(they had all that time)
2nd stanza - BUT
(there is no time)
3rd stanza - THEREFORE
(let's do it!)
SONNET 43 (Sonnets from the Portuguese)
Speaking and Listening
create a complex character
sustain the role and stay in character
explore the ideas and relationships from the poem
use appropriate language
Dramatic monologue (mini speech in character)
OR
Brief introduction to your character and Q&A (You can write down the questions you want me to ask)
The soldier from The Manhunt
The son from Nettles
The bride from The Farmer's Bride
Sister Maude and her version of the story
The nameless lover from In Paris With You
The lover from Quickdraw who never calls
The brother/sister left behind at the bus stop

Why was the poem written for you?
Describe the relationship with the person in question
How do you feel about this person/life in general?
What happened before/after the poem?
autobiographical?
repetition suggests breathlessness and excitement of the speaker
powerful
all-encompassing
loss of faith
Form:

narrative poem, free verse, spoken English

Structure:

1st stanza:
relationship established
2nd stanza:
rift between the siblings
3d stanza:
impact on the future relationship

Themes:

frustration, guilt, regret
Imagery:
sport- and movement-related imagery
Language:
contrast: youthful/mature language
BROTHERS
Saddled with
you
for the afternoon,
me and Paul
ambled across the threadbare field to the bus-stop,
talking over Sheffield Wednesday's chances in the cup
while you

skipped beside us in your
ridiculous tank-top
,
s
pouting
s
ix-year-old views on Rotherham United.

Suddenly you froze, said you hadn't any bus fare.
I sighed, said you should go and ask Mum
and while you
windmilled
home I looked at Paul.
His smile, like mine, said I was nine and he was ten
and we must
stroll
the town, doing what
grown-ups
do.

As a bus crested the hill we chased Olympic Gold.
Looking back
I saw you spring towards the gate,
your hand holding out what must have been a coin.
I ran on, unable to close the
distance
I'd set in motion.
first word:
negative
connotation
difference
in
movement
alliteration
to show
contempt
Can you find the imagery?
Physical and psychological wounds
Separate the words
into semantic fields
8.
7.
6.
5.
4..
3.
Can you find a quote for each image?
The Manhunt
After the first phase,
after passionate nights and intimate days,

only then would he let me trace
the frozen river which ran through his face,

only then would he let me explore
the blown hinge of his lower jaw,

and handle and hold
the damaged, porcelain collar-bone,
and mind and attend the fractured rudder of shoulder-blade,

and finger and thumb the parachute silk of his punctured lung.

Only then could I bind the struts
and climb the rungs of his broken ribs,

and feel the hurt
of his grazed heart.

Skirting along,
only then could I picture the scan,
the foetus of metal beneath his chest
where the bullet had finally come to rest.

Then I widened the search,
traced the scarring back to its source

to a sweating, unexploded mine
buried deep in his mind,

around which every nerve in his body had tightened and closed.
Then, and only then, did I come close.

Ancient Persian form of poetry
5 – 15 couplets
Final word in each couplet is the same
Last-but-one words in each stanza also rhyme
No enjambments between stanzas (not connected – not a story)
Themes: beauty, pains of love
Last stanza features the poet’s name (often as a pun)
GHAZAL: FORM
STRUCTURE and FORM
- Lyrical poem
- Strict form determines ideas and language
- Stanzas separated by punctuation offer different ideas and images in quick succession
If I am the grass and you the breeze, blow through me.
If I am the rose and you the bird, then woo me.

If you are the rhyme and I the refrain, don’t hang
on my lips, come and I’ll come too when you cue me.

If yours is the iron fist in the velvet glove
when the arrow flies, the heart is pierced, tattoo me.

If mine is the venomous tongue, the serpent’s tail,
charmer, use your charm, weave a spell and subdue me.


If I am the laurel leaf in your crown, you are
the arms around my bark, arms that never knew me.

Oh would that I were bark! So old and still in leaf.
And you, dropping in my shade, dew to bedew me!

What shape should I take to marry your own, have you
– hawk to my shadow, moth to my flame – pursue me?

If I rise in the east as you die in the west,
die for my sake, my love, every night renew me.

If, when it ends, we are just good friends, be my Friend,
muse, lover and guide, Shamsuddin to my Rumi.

Be heaven and earth to me and I’ll be twice the me
I am, if only half the world you are to me.
5th letter
7th letter
5th letter
1.
2.
3.
?
4.
6.
3rd letter
5.
1st letter
Watch the video and gather information about Khalvati and her attitude to poetry
Negative Emotions:
In Paris With You, Sister Maude, Brothers, The Farmer's Bride
Romantic Love:
The Manhunt, Hour, Ghazal
Parental Love:
Praise Song for My Mother, Nettles, (Born Yesterday)
Time:
Hour, Praise Song for My Mother, Sonnet 43
Aging:
Sonnet 116, To His Coy Mistress, Harmonium
Death:
Harmonium, To His Coy Mistress, Sonnet 116, Sonnet 43
Memory:
The Manhunt, Brothers, Praise Song for My Mother
Nature:
Ghazal, Praise Song for My Mother, The Farmer's Bride, Nettles
Pain:
Quickdraw, Harmonium, Nettles
Desire:
In Paris With You, To His Coy Mistress, The Farmer's Bride
Communication:
Harmonium, The Farmer's Bride, Quickdraw
Childhood:
Born Yesterday, Brothers, Nettles
Name two poems whose topic is
MEMORY
Brothers
The Manhunt
How is the theme of memory shown?
Three key quotations from the poem
Explanation/analysis of their meaning
Praise Song for My Mother
What is the title of the poem?
3 letters
3 letters
305
- 189
3 numbers
GRADE APPROXIMATIONS
35 - 40 A*
31 - 34 A
26 - 30 B
21 - 25 C
16 - 20 D
11 - 15 E
6 - 10 F
What do these tattoos represent?
FORM
Lyrical first person poem
Separate couplet-long stanzas– a slow step-by-step description
No regular rhyme and many enjambments – form is imperfect like the injured partner

STRUCTURE
Different injuries introduced in separate couplets (enumeration and polysyndeton) – the reader slowly explores the injuries just like the wife did
What is the effect of ... in The Manhunt?
repetition of 'only then'
polysyndeton
foetus
unexploded mine
source
irregular rhyme scheme
Only then did I come close
What do you remember about sonnets from R&J?
Anything interesting about the sonnet's appearance?
Is there a regular rhyme scheme?
Does it change at any point?
STRUCTURE and FORM
Link each image to Sonnet 116
Write down the name of the poem...
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
7.
6.
Shouldn't have left him at the bus stop, I s'ppose!
8.
How much can you remember about Hour?
6.
...
and
one word to sum up its meaning
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Robert Browning
Brangelina
=
Who are they?
Not a clue..
Band 5:
Sophisticated, perceptive

Band 4:
Assured, developed

Band 3:
Clear, consistent

Band 2:
Some

Band 1:
Limited
AO1
Focus on task, knowledge of the text, themes, choice of quotes

A02
Analysis of language
Analysis of structure

AO3
Comparison

AO4
Context
MARK SCHEME
Exam Papers:
Tue 8th December

Controlled Assessments:
Tue 15th - Fri 18th
When will I get my results?
POETRY EXAM (35%)
36 marks
18 marks
1 hour 15 minutes
45 minutes
Compare two poems from the anthology
30 minutes
Analyse an unseen poem
Find the poem we are looking at today. It contains these words:
sunrise
fishes
futures
Write down the name of the poem...
1.
2.
3.
6.
Shouldn't have left him at the bus stop, I s'ppose!
... and one word to sum up its meaning
4.
5.
Grade Approximations
35 - 40 A*
31 - 34 A
26 - 30 B
21 - 25 C
16 - 20 D
6 - 10 E
1.
5.
2.
3.
4.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Which poem?
Can you link each image to THCM?
How is the relationship between love and time presented in To His Coy Mistress and one other poem?
What type of love is presented in each poem?

How is time presented in each poem?

Which is presented as more powerful in each poem: time or love?

How does each poet use structure and form to describe the nature of love?
Can you link each image to Ghazal?
YOU and ME
imagey and ideas concentrated around the central concept of YOU and ME
Full transcript