Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Roosevelt's New Deal

No description
by

Luke Bailey

on 28 February 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Roosevelt's New Deal

Roosevelt's New Deal
25.2-3
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
In 1933, a new president, FDR, was elected. He promised to be the opposite of Hoover- while Hoover didn't do anything to help the Depression, he would.

Confined to a wheelchair due to polio, he famously declared in his inauguration speech: "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."
Emergency Banking Relief Act
In his first days in office, Roosevelt ordered all banks closed. Congress then passed the Emergency Banking Relief Act to allow banks to re-organize and have time to set their affairs in order.

In one of his "fireside chats" on the radio that defined his presidency, he told Americans that it was "safer to keep your money in a bank than under your matress."
The Hundred Days
In the first hundred days after becoming president, the capitol went into overtime drafting new laws. After years of nothing, it looked like D.C. was doing things again.

The laws passed by Congress and approved by FDR were known as the New Deal, which was a series of laws and programs in which the government intervened in the economy during the Great Depression.
Jobs and Relief
To create jobs, the New Deal included a number of work relief programs. FDR asked Congress to create the Civilian Conservation Corps, which employed 3 million people to work on public areas like parks.

He also created the Tennessee Valley Authority to bring electricity to rural areas. By building dams and creating artificial lakes, hydroelectric power spread through the south.
Criticism
Not everyone was a fan of this. Many argued that FDR was growing the power of government and eroding freedom. Many even compared him to a communist.

We still have these debates today- Obama, for example, has often been compared to FDR because of Obamacare.
The Dust Bowl
The 1930s were a time of an environmental disaster in the Great Plains. States like Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and Colorado were part of a region known as the Dust Bowl.

When a drought hit in 1931, crops died and loose soil was free to blow away. Massive dust storms and tornadoes were frequent. Many farmers migrated to California to escape.
Radical Political Movements
The Great Depression effected the whole world, and many radical groups rose up promising a solution.

Communists and socialists claimed the Depression was the result of a failed system, with corrupt bankers and investors destroying the nations economy. They wanted even more government intervention.

In Germany and Italy, fascist movements rose up supporting dictatorships. Jewish bankers, in their mind, were largely responsible for the crises (remember that this is happening at the same time Germany is trying to pay reparations).

In Spain, a Civil War began between fascists and anarchists/communists.
Entertainment
The 1930s saw a growth in entertainment as people wanted to forget their troubles.

Daytime dramas on the radio were popular- they were called "soap operas" because they were often sponsored by laundry detergents.

Walt Disney produced Snow White. The Wizard of Oz was also a hit.
Reminder
QUIZ FRiday
Mini Economics Lesson
At the root of all economic debates is a question: how much should government get involved in the economy?

Advocates of free markets say "little": economies go up and down, but letting people spend/sell/hire how they choose is always better in the long run. (Invisible hand)

Proponents of government involvement disagree- when the economy is in trouble, government can really help by spending money.
What to do?
Herbert Hoover was a free market guy- he was not a fan of the government spending money in a depression.

Some, like FDR, disagreed- they said that that's when the government SHOULD borrow and spend money, paying it back when the economy is on its feet. This is known as stimulus.
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Cotton on the roadside, cotton in the ditch
We all picked the cotton but we never got rich
Daddy was a veteran, a southern democrat
They oughta get a rich man to vote like that
Sing it
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Well somebody told us Wall Street fell
But we were so poor that we couldn't tell
Cotton was short and the weeds were tall
But Mr. Roosevelt's a gonna save us all
Well momma got sick and daddy got down
The county got the farm and they moved to town
Pappa got a job with the TVA
He bought a washing machine and then a Chevrolet
Sing it
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Play it
Sing it
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Song, song of the south
Gone, gone with the wind
Song, song of the south.
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth.
Song, song of the south.
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth.
Sing it
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Song, song of the south
Sweet potato pie and I shut my mouth
Gone, gone with the wind
There ain't nobody looking back again
Full transcript