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Poetry analysis of what horror to awake at night

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by

David Plotkin

on 1 May 2013

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Transcript of Poetry analysis of what horror to awake at night

Meaning that the person has been through a lot they have become "pale" and "Puffing". Now, it's too late to go back and fix his or her problems and mistakes. Reader can infer that this thought is the realization that the speaker has wasted a sizable portion of his/her life. suggests the outcome of a person who has wasted their life and not lived their life to the fullest As a person is looking back on their life, they will have “The thought that stings”. “I’m pillowed and padded, pale and puffing” (11). According to Niedecker, the most disappointing realization is the reader recognizing that “I’ve spent my life on nothing” (5). What Horror to Awake at Night
By Lorine Niedecker In “What Horror to Awake at Night”, Niedecker uses alliteration and repetition to warn the reader of wasting one’s life away on “nothing”. emphasizes the importance by repeating this line at the end of each stanza. The Message Behind the poem It is imperative to live life to the fullest so that one day a person won't have the epiphany that they’ve spent their life on "nothing".
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