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Family Change Example

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adrianne washington

on 26 July 2016

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Transcript of Family Change Example

Family Change Assessment Example
Louise Scott Moragne
Louise Scott Moragne, affectionately known as "Gram", was born
in Savannah, Georgia, in February of 1922. Both of her parents were African American. Her father was a welder and her mother was a home-maker; they were a lower-middle class family, but for a significant portion of her childhood they were living in poverty due to the Great Depression in the 1930s. Growing up, in the south, in the 1920s and 1930s, my grandmother experienced segregation, discrimination and prejudice, so much so that even today she has trouble trusting people of other races.
In 1930, her mother passed away and she moved from Georgia to Pennsylvania to live with her older sister, Ada, and other family members in the area.
In 1938, when she was 16, she married my Grandfather, Felder Moragne, who was 22, and moved to New Jersey a few years later. From their union, 14 children were born- their 12th child is my mother.
While in New Jersey, my Grandfather built the home that my
Grandmother lived in until she passed away in 2015. The home has 7 bedrooms and 7 bathrooms and the basement served as a store for 20 years, which provided additional income.

Adrianne Wells Washington
My grandmother was also a home-maker and she landed a job as a maid when some of her children were older, but that only lasted for one day; she quit after the first day! She never obtained a driver's license, but that did not keep her from driving! In her household, she cooked, cleaned and made the majority of the clothing for her six daughters. My mother always doted on the fact that they never ate cereal or any type of "instant breakfast" because my Grandfather. She also made money baking sweet potato pies, but my Grandfather preferred that she not work outside of the home.

My grandfather was the breadwinner and made a decent living working as a carpenter for churches in order to provide for the family; he was also a Pastor at a church in Philadelphia until he passed away in 1988. Gram never completed high school; however, she has four children who obtained college degrees. Seven of her sons were in the military, which may explain why there is a gap between education levels.
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I was born in 1981, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and am my Grandmother's 35th grandchild. I am one of six children all born between 1980 and 1989. My parents are both African American, but my Dad's mother was mixed: she was African American and Caucasian. I remember childhood experiences with her during the summer and the looks we would get from people in town because of the drastic differences in skin color.
When I was 5, we moved from Pennsylvania to New Jersey so my mother could have more support with all of the children. We lived with my Aunt until I was 8 and moved again into a single family home where I lived until I moved to college - the home had 5 bedrooms, so there was ample space for all of the kids. Every two years, someone moved out to go to school. In 2008, my parents sold our family home and moved into a 55 and older community. Then in 2012, they sold their condo and moved back to Lancaster, where my father was born.
Growing up, all of the girls were responsible for most of the domestic work. I remember my brothers having to take out the trash, shovel snow, or help with building things around the house. The girls did all of the cleaning and cooking. My mother did not do chores for almost 15 years because the girls took care of everything.

Family Change Assessment
1981
1922
Louise Scott Moragne, affectionately known as "Gram", was born in Savannah, Georgia, in February of 1922. Both of her parents were African American. Her father was a welder and her mother was a home-maker. They were considered to be in the lower class. Growing up in the 1920s and 1930s, in the south, my grandmother experienced segregation and her fair share of discrimination and prejudice, so much so that even today she has trouble trusting people from other races.
When she was 16, she married my Grandfather, Felder Moragne, who was 22, and moved to New Jersey. From their union 14 children were born; their 12th child is my mother.
My grandmother never had a job outside of the home and never obtained a driver's license; however, she cooked, cleaned and made the majority of the clothing for the household. My grandfather was the breadwinner, and made a decent living working as a carpenter for churches in order to provide for the family. Gram never completed high school; however, she has two children who obtained college degrees: my uncle (#11) and my mother (#12).
I was born in 1981, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and am my Grandmother's 35th grandchild. I am one of six children all born between 1980 and 1989. My parents are both African American, but my Dad's mother was mixed: she was African American and Caucasian. I remember childhood experiences with her during the summer and the looks we would get from people in town because of the drastic differences in skin color.
When I was 5 we moved from Pennsylvania to New Jersey so my mother could have more support with all of the children. We lived with my Aunt until I was 8 and moved again into a single family home where I lived until I moved to college. In 2008, my parents sold our family home and moved into a 55 and older community. Then in 2012, they sold their condo and moved back to Lancaster, where my father was born.
Growing up, all of the girls were responsible for most of the domestic work. I remember my brothers having to take out the trash, shovel snow, or help with building things around the house. The girls did all of the cleaning and cooking. My mother did not do chores for almost 15 years because the girls took care of everything.

My mother was a stay-at-home mom until my youngest sibling turned 5. My Dad worked two jobs so that my mother could stay home. He was employed at Lockheed Martin for 25 years, but we were still in the middle class. In 2014, he started to receive a pension which helps with his expenses while he is in school now. Neither of my parents obtained a college degree until 2011, around the time my youngest sibling graduated from college. I am the second grandchild of only three who has an advanced degree, which I obtained when I was 23 years old.
The social mobility within my extended family has not been drastic, but this is not true for my nuclear family - we have experienced considerable vertical mobility. All of my siblings have bachelor's degrees and one has a master's degree. Out of over 89 grandchildren and great-grandchildren, only 10 people have a degree, 6 of those individuals are in my immediate family.
Objectives
In this paper, you will describe the changes within your family between two generations, based on the following aspects:

Education
Social Class
Social Roles
Technology
Race/Ethnicity
Structure of the family

This is just an example of the writing style for this paper. I have not covered all of the items required - this is just an example.
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