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The New Golden Age of Oil

Data Management Presentation of growing oil consumption and CO2 Emissions.
by

Dolly R

on 14 January 2013

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Transcript of The New Golden Age of Oil

The New Golden Age of Oil By: Shannon Rode & Anouchka Dolly Ramkishore
Data Management Statistical Project Hypothesis: Canada's recent increase in the
supply of oil made this topic ideal. With a growing population, we have predicted that there would be a positive correlation for the selected information.

This was validated once we further analyzed our data. OIL CONSUMPTION
VS.
CO2 EMISSIONS Single Variable: Oil Consumption (in metric tonnes) Single Variable: Oil Consumption (in metric tonnes) Single Variable: CO2 Emissions (in metric tonnes) Single Variable: CO2 Emissions (in metric tonnes) Double Variable: Oil Consumption vs. CO2 Emissions (in metric tonnes) CO2 Emissions Oil Consumption This graph displays Canada's oil consumption over a period of 41 years. It is evident that the graph shows a moderate positive linear trend. Further Analysis of Chart: Mean: 80,122,820
1st Quartile: 73,679,250
Median: 80,400,500
3rd Quartile: 87,079,250

Standard Deviation: 10,912,800.93 Further Analysis of Chart: Mean: 15,374,508,024
1st Quartile: 10,857,522,500
Median: 15,033,043,667
3rd Quartile: 19,622,845,917

Standard Deviation: 5,285,685,967 The first quartile contains years where Canada consumed 73,679,250 metric tonnes of oil
Mean and median are almost the same, the spread is fairly even
Third quartile contains years where 87,079,250 metric tonnes or more of oil was consumed
The relatively high standard deviation suggests that there were many highs and lows Explanations: The first quartile contains years where Canada produced 15,374,508,024 metric tonnes of CO2
Mean and median are almost the same, the spread is fairly even
Third quartile contains years where 19,622,845,917 metric tonnes or more of CO2 was produced
The very high standard deviation suggests that there has been lots of inconsistency in the CO2 emissions produced Explanation: The sudden drop in the 70s occurred as oil companies were unable to produce as much oil as predicted
Caused sudden downturn rather than an increase in production Oil Peak Crisis 1979: Population Growth: Oil companies recovered from this crisis
Able to resume "normal" production to sustain growing population The majority of oil consumption over the year resulted in about 7.5 billion and 8.5 billion.
Slightly skewed to the right. Article from the Globe & Mail: Canada's expanding oil production is in the spotlight as demand rises.
Canada defends itself stating that they only account for 2% of gas emissions while China emits 10 times more.
The International Energy Agency warns countries that they only have a few years to stabilize their emissions This graph displays Canada's CO2 emissions over a period of 41 years. It is evident that the graph shows a very strong positive linear trend. Figures of 2010 show that the greenhouse gases levels are higher than the anticipated "worst-case scenario" The majority of the CO2 over the year resulted in about 12 billion and 20 billion.
Fairly skewed to the right - rising trend The r^2 indicates that 50% of the data is on the line of regression.
The r value is 0.71 means that the data had a close correlation to the line of regression.
Therefore graph depicts moderate positive linear correlation. Oil Consumption vs. CO2 Emissions Further Analysis of the Graph reveals... Population Growth: The "bias"... Using this data, environmentalists...
Years where CO2 emissions were high along with high oil consumption/production
Filing and protests and petitions to prevent oil pipes and the continuation of oil exploitation.

An energy-thirsty world will need ‘every drop’ of growing production in Canada’s oil sands, but the industry will need to reassure a skeptical public that development can be done in an environmentally sustainable way, the International Energy Agency’s chief economist says.
(Caterpillar Inc.) Carbon dioxide keeps rising: Oil is a basic necessity
Cars have become "the norm" in most or almost all countries Oil is essential to our lives. There is a growing
global demand... which
will continue... Cause & Effect Relationship (increase in on factor = increase in the other) This confirms the hypothesis and our predictions to grow... for years and years to come... used for production/manufacturing/cars.... daily lives THANK YOU FOR WATCHING OUR PRESENTATION : ) A Quick Video about Oil: Canada's Oil Consumption Distribution Canada's CO2 Emissions Distribution Canada's Oil Consumption vs. CO2 Emissions
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