Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

National Black Feminist Organization

No description
by

African American Studies

on 21 November 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of National Black Feminist Organization

Origin
National Black Feminist Organization
Goal: Address unique issues affecting Black women in America

*Double burden of sexism and racism
Essence
*Statement of Purpose*
Destiny
Ms.
Magazine
What they would do now
Some issues that NBFO dealt with are still prevalent today such as :
the portrayal of black women in the media, lesbian rights, and the focus on someone who suffers from racism, classism, and sexism.
Combahee River Collective (CRC)
1974-1980
Barbara Smith and other delegates provided the groundwork

Formed by the breakaway Boston NBFO chapter

Named after the only military campaign in American history planned led by a woman

Statement of Purpose contrasts greatly with that of NBFO

National Black Feminist Organization
Courtney Campbell, Prenetia Clark, Breana Richardson, Natasha Byrdsong
NBFO stopped meeting nationally in 1977 and smaller charters stopped meeting in 1980
Modern foundations that are similar to NBFO are the Combahee River Collective, the African American Women's Organization,
A couple of NBFO founders became editors of
Ms.
magazine.
Margaret Sloan-Hunter
Michele Wallace
A feminist magazine founded by Gloria Steinem and Letty Pogrebin.
Key Event
New York City
November 30 – December 2, 1973
At Cathedral of Saint John the Divine
Attended by about 400 women
Eastern Regional Conference
*NBFO was officially announced on August 15, 1973
*August 16th, received over 400 inquiries from interested women
"The distorted male-dominated media image of the Women’s Liberation Movement has clouded the vital and revolutionary importance of this movement to Third World women, especially black women. The Movement has been characterized as the exclusive property of so-called white middle-class women and any black women seen involved in this movement have been seen as “selling out,” “dividing the race,” and an assortment of nonsensical epithets. Black feminists resent these charges and have therefore established The National Black Feminist Organization, in order to address ourselves to the particular and specific needs of the larger, but almost cast-aside half of the black race in Amerikkka, the black woman."
Focus
Founded May 1973 until 1977 in New York
by
*Margaret Sloan-Hunter
*Michele Wallace
*Faith Ringgold
*Florynce Kennedy
and others.....
By February of 1974 there were over 2,000 members and 10 chapters across the nation
Minimum wage for domestic workers Sterilization Abuse



Welfare rights Equal access to abortion,
child care, and health care



Reproductive rights for black women Rape and Sexual Abuse







Countering negative images
One predominant issue that still occurs today is the pay wage gap. For every dollar that a white, nonhispanic male makes, an African American woman makes 64 cents.
*source: nationalpartnership.org
Reasons it Didn't Work
*Some say that the reason that NBFO became defunct was that they failed to agree on what constituted a "Feminist Black Politic"
*Source: Alice Echols, Daring to be Bad: Radical Feminism in America 1967-1975
Black Feminism
Feminism
Womanism
Patrica Hill Collins
Alice Walker
Full transcript