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WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT

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Paola Morillo

on 28 August 2017

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Transcript of WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT

WHAT IS THE WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT (WA)?
RATIONALE
REQUIREMENTS:
INSIGHT:
REQUIREMENTS:
TASK
REQUIREMENTS:
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT
GUIDE TO AN EFFECTIVE WA
PRACTICING RELEVANT SKILLS
REQUIREMENTS:
REQUIREMENTS:
PRACTICING RELEVANT SKILLS
REQUIREMEMTNS:
INSIGHT
WEIGHTING: 20% OF YOUR TOTAL IB GRADE.
This consists of
creative writing task of 500 - 600 words
linked to
two
Literary Texts
read in class.

It must also have
a 150 - 200 word Rationale
.
It must be written during the final year of the Diploma Program and it is externally assessed.
It must be the independent work of a student, under the teacher's guidance.
Students must write a
150 - 200 word Rationale
introducing the assignment that must include:
a brief introduction to the Literary Text.
a brief explanation of how the work is linked to the Literary Text(s)
Student's intended aim
explanation of how the student intends to achieve his/her aim(s) - Choice of Text types, audience, register, style, and so on.
It is the ability to read thoughtfully, form a view, extract support material from what has been read, and then express that view through an appropriate text type, whose conventions they can handle.
The challenge of the WA is that all of the skills mentioned above have to be used in a coherent and integrated way
to produce a piece of work which is (probably) larger than
that normally practiced, and more significant in that it
forms part of Final Assessment.
The two invented phrases above point effectively to the crucial skills
needed for success in the WA, and so these should be the skills
exercised:-

'creative reading'
- attentive reading, looking actively for possibilities

This essentially means scanning exercises - as appropriate to the text,
ask the students to, for example :-

at HL - developing from a literary work

see the scene from another character's point of view
select nice/nasty, good/bad, to create a contrasting feeling of the text
select pro/con ideas, to create a contrasting argument of the text
at key point, change - "When he says "No", he says "Yes" - what happens then?"
'intertextual writing'
- the efficient incorporation / recycling of ideas extracted from the source(s)

From the SCANned details above, develop ideas in detail in order to give a sequence to what you want to write - by using processes such as :

at HL
- developing from a literary work

experiment with climax/anticlimax
look for a surprise twist - take the reader in one direction, then change
expand details from the source text - such as single phrases expanded into full descriptions
Invent details to add to what you already have - making sure that the details extend, don't contradict
How do we encourage and enable students to have 'creative' ideas? I suggest some techniques to stimulate an imaginative approach:

reversal
… make a radical change to some element of the work.

Most useful for dealing with key points of the plot. For instance, in
'The Bridges of Madison County'
, the heroine has a crucial moment when she has to decide whether to run away with the man she loves. She doesn't, and stays with her family - but what if she had ... ?

change
… make a subtle but significant change to some element of the work.

This would involve looking at causes and motivations, and thinking about which of these make a really significant impact on the work. For instance, in
'The Lord of the Flies'
, what would have happened if Piggy was not fat and asthmatic, but was actually prepared finally to get into a fight ...?
REQUIREMENTS
INSIGHT
other POVs
... take a scene, or aspect, of the work, and describe it as interpreted by one of the characters.

Probably one of the easiest options to take, in that one would not have to invent new details of the story, but rather re-interpret what is actually given, according to the character's attitudes and opinions. For instance, in
'
The Curious Incident'
..., how might Siobhan, Christopher's counsellor, have described some incident that Christopher tells from his own idiosyncratic point of view ...?
REQUIREMENTS
INSIGHT
additions
… suggest a fuller treatment of some aspect of the work that the author has not developed in detail.

The imaginative development of clues within the text. For instance, in
'The Great Gatsby'
, at the moment when Gatsby meets Daisy again after years, Nick the narrator tactfully steps outside, so we never know what they actually said to each other - but given what we know of their characters, what might they have said ...?
REQUIREMENTS:
INSIGHT
gaps
… fill in some aspect of the work that the author has indicated but has not described.

Most commonly, this might involve adding sections before or after the action of the story. For instance, in
'The Lord of the Flies'
, what sort of conversation would Jack or Ralph have had with the officers on the warship that rescues the boys ... ?
TREATMENT:
The Subject Guide says that the text type "...may be chosen from the recommended text types listed for paper 2 ..." (p.42). This means the following text types :

Article … Blog/diary entry … Brochure, leaflet, flyer, pamphlet, advertisement … Interview … Introduction to debate, speech, talk, presentation … News report … Official report … Proposal … Review … Set of instructions, guidelines … Written correspondence
WEAK ASSIGNMENTS...
Didn't relate the Task to the Rationale
Didn't relate the task to the Literary work.
Didn't clearly state aims in the Rationale.
Didn't explain how the Text Type would inform the task.
Also...
New endings or new chapters were generally
not successful.
STRONG ASSIGNMENTS:
Specified which Literary work was included in the assignment.
Commented on how text type, audience, register, and style help to achieve aims.
FINAL TIPS:
Focus your task on a specific aspect/part of the Literary work to demonstrate understanding of the Literary work.
Make sure your task is linked to the Literary work
In the Task
DO WHAT YOU SAY YOU'RE GOING TO DO
in the Rationale.
Use language appropriate to your Text Type.
Don't copy a lot from the Literary Text.
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