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Hamlet Themes

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Mahrukh Awan

on 21 July 2015

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Transcript of Hamlet Themes

H A M L E T
INTRODUCTION
THEMES
ACTIVITY
T H E M E S :
Revenge
Rejected Love
Family
Appearance vs. Reality
REJECTED LOVE
REVENGE
APPEARANCE vs. REALITY

FAMILY PRESSURE
FAMILY L VE
&
By
By: Mahrukh, Nisha, Syeda
PARENT-CHILD RELATION

FATHER-SON RELATION:
POLONIOUS AND LAERTES
FAMILY
MOTHER-SON RELATION:
GERTRUDE AND HAMLET
FATHER-SON RELATION:
GHOST/KING HAMLET AND HAMLET
FATHER-DAUGHTER RELATION: POLONIOUS AND OPHELIA
Hamlet
Claudius
Polonius
- Appears mad in front of others so that he can gain the opportunity to kill Claudius

- Exaggerates and shows tremendous hatred and disgust towards Ophelia


-Disguises himself of being a gentle and concerned King

-Uses Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to spy on Hamlet


- Appears to be a trustworthy and caring father

- Sends a spy on his own son, Laertes
H A M L E T
F O R T I N B R A S
L A E R T E S
"QUEEN GERTRUDE
What shall I do?
HAMLET
Not this, by no means, that I bid you do:
Let the bloat king tempt you again to bed;
Pinch wanton on your cheek; call you his mouse;
And let him, for a pair of reechy kisses,
Or paddling in your neck with his damn'd fingers,
Make you to ravel all this matter out,
That I essentially am not in madness,
But mad in craft. 'Twere good you let him know;
For who, that's but a queen, fair, sober, wise,
Would from a paddock, from a bat, a gib,
Such dear concernings hide? who would do so?
No, in despite of sense and secrecy,
Unpeg the basket on the house's top.
Let the birds fly, and, like the famous ape,
To try conclusions, in the basket creep,
And break your own neck down.
QUEEN GERTRUDE
Be thou assured, if words be made of breath,
And breath of life, I have no life to breathe
What thou hast said to me (Act 3, scene 4)."
"LORD POLONIUS
Yet here, Laertes! aboard, aboard, for shame!
The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
And you are stay'd for. There; my blessing with thee!
And these few precepts in thy memory
See thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatch'd, unfledged comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice;
Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine ownself be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell: my blessing season this in thee!
LAERTES
Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord (Act 1, scene 3)."
"KING CLAUDIUS
Our son shall win.
QUEEN GERTRUDE
He's fat, and scant of breath.
Here, Hamlet, take my napkin, rub thy brows;
The queen carouses to thy fortune, Hamlet.
HAMLET
Good madam!
KING CLAUDIUS
Gertrude, do not drink.
QUEEN GERTRUDE
I will, my lord; I pray you, pardon me.
KING CLAUDIUS
[Aside] It is the poison'd cup: it is too late.
HAMLET
I dare not drink yet, madam; by and by.
QUEEN GERTRUDE
Come, let me wipe thy face (Act 5, scene 2)."
"LORD POLONIUS
Ay, springes to catch woodcocks. I do know,
When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
Lends the tongue vows: these blazes, daughter,
Giving more light than heat, extinct in both,
Even in their promise, as it is a-making,
You must not take for fire. From this time
Be somewhat scanter of your maiden presence;
Set your entreatments at a higher rate
Than a command to parley. For Lord Hamlet,
Believe so much in him, that he is young
And with a larger tether may he walk
Than may be given you: in few, Ophelia,
Do not believe his vows; for they are brokers,
Not of that dye which their investments show,
But mere implorators of unholy suits,
Breathing like sanctified and pious bawds,
The better to beguile. This is for all:
I would not, in plain terms, from this time forth,
Have you so slander any moment leisure,
As to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet.
Look to't, I charge you: come your ways.
OPHELIA
I shall obey, my lord (Act 1, scene 3)."
"Ghost
I am thy father's spirit,
Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night,
And for the day confined to fast in fires,
Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature
Are burnt and purged away. But that I am forbid
To tell the secrets of my prison-house,
I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part
And each particular hair to stand on end,
Like quills upon the fretful porpentine:
But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood. List, list, O, list!
If thou didst ever thy dear father love--
HAMLET
O God!
Ghost
Revenge his foul and most unnatural murder.
HAMLET
Murder!
Ghost
Murder most foul, as in the best it is;
But this most foul, strange and unnatural.
HAMLET
Haste me to know't, that I, with wings as swift
As meditation or the thoughts of love,
May sweep to my revenge (Act 1, scene 5)."
In groups of six prepare a skit on the given scenario.
Each person must be assigned a role
At the end, raise your hand to guess the theme being presented in each group's skit.
*Don't make the theme so obvious in your skit
Hamlet is rejected by:
Gertrude as a son
Ophelia as a lover
Hamlet is rejected by Gertrude
Hamlet is rejected by Ophelia
OPHELIA
My honour'd lord, you know right well you did;
And, with them, words of so sweet breath composed
As made the things more rich: their perfume lost,
Take these again; for to the noble mind
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
There, my lord.
HAMLET
Ha, ha! are you honest?
OPHELIA
My lord?
HAMLET
Are you fair?
OPHELIA
What means your lordship?
HAMLET
That if you be honest and fair, your honesty should
admit no discourse to your beauty.
OPHELIA
Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than
with honesty?
HAMLET
Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
force of honesty can translate beauty into his
likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
time gives it proof. I did love you once.
OPHELIA
Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so (Act 3, scene 1).
WOMEN
Throughout the play, women are projected as:
- weak
- dependent
- less dominant
- manipulated
Death of Ophelia and Gertrude occurs at the end implying the weakness of women during that era

"My lord, as I was sewing in my closet,/Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all unbraced;/No hat upon his head; his stockings fouled,/Ungartered, and down-gyvèd to his ankle;/Pale as his shirt; his knees knocking each other;/And with a look so piteous in purport/As if he had been loosèd out of hell."
(Act 2, Scene 1: Lines 77 – 84)
...The need we have to use you did provoke/Our hasty sending. Something have you heard/Of Hamlet’s “transformation”—so call it/Since nor th' exterior nor the inward man/Resembles that it was. What it should be,/More than his father’s death, that thus hath put him/So much from th' understanding of himself,/I cannot dream of. I entreat you both/That, being of so young days brought up with him/And since so neighbored to his youth and 'havior,/That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court/Some little time so by your companies/To draw him on to pleasures and to gather..."
(Act 2, Scene 2: Lines 1 – 18)
GERTRUDE
Have you forgot me?

HAMLET
No, by the rood, not so:
You are the queen, your husband's brother's wife;
And--would it were not so!--you are my mother.
3.4.14
Laertes vs. Hamlet
Hamlet vs. Claudius
Hamlet
A villain kills my father, and for that
I, his sole son, do this same villain send
To heaven.
Why this is [hire and salary], not revenge. 3.3.80

Laertes
I dare damnation: to this point I stand, That both the worlds I give to negligence, Let come what comes; only I’ll be revenged Most thoroughly for my father
4.5.131-134
HAMLET
Witness this army of such mass and charge,
Led by a delicate and tender prince,
…How stand I then,
That have a father kil'd, a mother stain'd,
Excitements of my reason and my blood,
And let all sleep, while to my shame I see
The imminent death of twenty thousand men
That, for a fantasy and trick of fame,
Go to their graves like beds, fight for a plot
Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause,
Which is not tomb enough and continent
To hide the slain?
O, from this time forth
My thoughts be bloody or be nothing worth
(4.4.43-66)

THANK YOU :)
"Look you, sir,/Inquire me first what Danskers are in Paris,/And how, and who, what means, and where they keep/What company at what expense; and finding/By this encompassment and drift of question/That they do know my son, come you more nearer/Than your particular demands will touch it."
(Act 2, Scene 1: Lines 7-16)
Full transcript