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Em@il

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by

Laura Randazzo

on 12 January 2014

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Transcript of Em@il

Em@il
Netiquette
An actual email I recently received:
is there any way i could make up for my missed assignments and get them to you because im worried im going to fail
Email - Mind Your Manners
What's wrong with this email?
Right! This student wants help, but doesn't know enough to use the shift key or punctuation marks.
Would you be excited about helping this person?
Here's another actual email:
I didn't understand today's material on thesis writing. Explain this.
What's wrong with this email?
Right! The tone is harsh and demanding. Is any teacher going to want to spend an evening rewriting that day's lesson into an email format for this student?
If you're writing an email to a teacher or business person, it's probably because you want something from that person.
Follow these
simple
3
steps
and increase the likelihood that adults will want to help you
Step
Identify
1
yourself
The recipient probably has hundreds of business contacts. Your opening line should include your name and the context of your relationship.
Ex:
Dear Mr. Smith,
My name is Sally Student, a freshman at Roosevelt High School, and I enjoyed meeting you at last weekend's Summit workshop for teens.
Step

Write
2
Be polite, but quickly get to the point. Business people are busy and don't have time to wade through a lengthy email.

efficiently
• Keep it simple
• If the bulk of the message is too long, the recipient might just skim or even trash your message without finishing it
• Avoid sarcasm or attempts at humor;
both are seen as unprofessional
Step
Proofread
3
• Did you splel chekc your email?
• Reread with an ear for tone. Could someone misinterpret your meaning? If so, rewrite.
• Stay classy
– Use salutations
– Consider if your request is reasonable
– Include a polite sign-off
– Avoid text-talk (ex: LTR or LOL)
People who are older than you think this is lazy or indifferent, even if that's not your intent.
Avoid text-talk in the professional world.
A few more things...
• Be patient – Unwritten "24-48 hr. Rule"

Also, be sure to include offline contact info. at the end of your message, such as a phone number, so you can quickly be reached by the recipient, if need be.
gummybears4ever@hotmail.com
rstevenson@gmail.com
This helps the recipient quickly know what you need.
If you wouldn't want your grandma to hear you saying it, you shouldn't write it in an email.
:) = :(
Seen as unprofessional; use actual words to express emotions
Don't yell at people!
You might need an answer right away, but the recipient is busy, too.

Avoid the ``Did you get my email?" email.
Give the recipient
at least two days
to respond.
• Use a professional email address
• Use a clear subject line
• Email is forever; don't embarrass yourself
• Avoid emoticons in business world
• ALL CAPS = BAD!
Now,
let's see how this
looks in the
real world.
Evaluate four emails
I'm going to hand out now.
Be sure to follow
the directions on
the worksheets.
Full transcript