Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Diwali

No description
by

Ashley Nguyen

on 20 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Diwali

Diwali
Festival of Lights
Religious Group
Diwali (Devali) or Deepavali, is
India's largest
and most important holiday
mainly for Hinduism,
but can also be celebrated
by all Indians regardless
of their faith.
When?
Where?
Who?
What?
Major celebrations in
India
Canada
United Kingdom
New Zealand
And other countries around the world with a notable Hindu population.
This celebration takes place where there
are followers or admirers of Hinduism.
homes
backyards
courtyards
businesses
temples
It takes place in people's
Diwali happens around October or November
in the Hindu calendar, which is based
on the positions of the moon and the sun
(Lunisolar calendar).
This year the main Diwali
is on November 13th, but it
starts on November 11th
until the 15th.
This rite is celebrated for five consecutive days...
Begins
Finishes
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Dhanteras/Dhantrayodashi
Dhan=wealth
Trayodashi=13th day
Lengend:
Lord Dhanwantari emerged from the waters holding the knowledge of spiritual medicines of Ayurveda to help fight against sickness, disease and death.
On this day devotees would . . .
worship Goddess of Wealth
worship Lord of Death for protection
purchase valuables & light lamps
parents or grandparents accompany children to buy firecrackers & sweets
spread firecrackers outside to dry so when the time comes it doesn't fail to perform
Naraka Chaturdasi
Narak=purgatory/hell
Chaturdasi=14th day
Legend:
Lord Sri Kirshna released the world from darkness of fear and oppression in a legendary battle between the gods and demons.
This marked the end of the evil empire and the beginning of a new era of Light & Knowledge.
On this day devotees . . . .
take ritual baths with herbs before sunrise
rest for the remaining day with friend & family
Actual Diwali/Deepavali
Legend:
Lord Krishna completed incarnation upon earth and left the world leaving behind pandavas and kinsmen in utter confusion.
Devotees would . . . .
worship Lakshmi, Goddess of Wealth
worship offerings to Lord Vinayaka and Mother Goddess
perform pooja in the morning & evening
clean house & make sure it's properly lighted
visit temples & other houses to distribute sweets & gifts
light up diyas (lamps), candles, & firecrackers
feast
watch fireworks
Diwali=Row of Lights
Padwa/Varshapratipada/ Kartika Shudda Padyami
Followers . . . .
in North India worship Govardhan
in temples of Mathura & Nathdwara priests give special baths to deities, decorate them & offer lots of food
in traditional households women honour their husbands and recieve gifts & blessings
in businesses offer prayers for luck & prosperity for the new financial year
Legend:
The people of Braj worshipped the hillock Govardhan to save themselves from an impending storm unleashed by the fury of Indra, the Lord of Heaven.
Bhayiduj/Bhayyaduj/Bhavbij/
Bhayitka
Legend:
Yamuna, the sister of Lord Yama honoured her brother with a talik on his forehead and wished him a long life.
On the last day . . . .
brothers & sisters express love & affection
sisters put ceremonial mark on their brother's forehead and wish them a long life
Many Indians around the world take part in the Festival of Lights
Individual Needs
Physiological
Safety
Social
Esteem
Self-

Actualization
Self-Transcendence
Love & Affection
People use this time of year to strengthen relationships with family and friends.
Children experience the joy of growing up
This festival is a reminder for primary responsibility to pursue the path of light and find divinity.
Community Needs
Self-

Actualization
Esteem
Social
Safety
Physiological
Self-Transcendence
Opportunity to boost sales and increase profits in businesses and commercial establishments
People gather to witness the lights of Diwali &
everyone receives due share of enjoyment
Need to Eat
Feasts (food & sweets)
By Ashley Nguyen
Full transcript