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Acids & Bases Project

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by

Tyler Gurley

on 30 April 2015

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Transcript of Acids & Bases Project

Bases
Categorizing Acids & Bases
Neutralization Reaction
2 Interesting Facts
Strong Acids/Bases
Acids are sour tasting substances that turn litmus paper red and has a pH of 6.9 or less.
Some characteristics are the sour taste, turns litmus paper red, has a greater concentration of [H+] than [OH-], pH less than 6.9.
A strong acid has a pH around 0-2 and has an extremely larger concentration of [H+] than [OH-].
Some examples include lemons, sodas, HC2H3O2 (Acetic Acid).
The neutralization reaction of an acid with a base will always produce water and a salt. If we were to mix an acid and base together, the H+ ion would combine with the OH- ion to make H2O, or plain water.

Examples are:
HCl + NaOH ---> H2O + NaCl

HBr + KOH ---> H2O + KBr
Bases are bitter tasting substances that turn litmus paper blue and has a pH of 7.1 or more. Can be hazardous if consumed.
Some characteristics are the bitter taste, turns litmus paper blue, has a greater concentration of [OH-] than [H+], pH greater than 7.1.
A strong base has a pH around 12-14 and has an extremely larger concentration of [OH-] than [H+].
Some examples of bases are soaps, baking soda, and C3H6O (Acetone)
Arrhenius Acids: Hydrogen-containing that ionize to give H+
Arrhenius Bases: This ionizes to give off the OH-

Bronsted-Lowry Acids: This is the hydrogen-ion donor
Bronsted-Lowry Bases: This is the hydrogen-ion acceptor

Lewis Acids: Substance that can accept a pair of electrons (e-) to form a covalent bond
Lewis Bases: Substance that can donate a pair of electrons (e-) to form a covalent bond
There are acids actually in milk! The acid which is found in milk I called lactic acid. This acid is used to form yogurt.

Bases are actually way more dangerous if consumed! You can really only consume to the pH of around 8-9, while with acids you can consume up to a pH of 2.3.
You can use the pH scale on the previous slide to see different kinds of acids and bases.
Strong Acids can be from a pH of about 1-0.
Some examples of these are: Stomach acid and Battery Acid

Strong Bases can be from a pH of about 13-14.
Some examples of these are: Bleaches and Liquid drain cleaner and oven cleaner.
By, Tyler & Logan
Acids & Bases Project
Acids
pH
Acids and Bases concentration is measured in pH but has to be converted from molarity.
To find the pH of a substance given [H+], you will use the formula pH=-log([H+]
So, if [H+]=1.0x10^-7 what is the pH of that substance.
Now, insert the [H+] into your given formula.
pH=-log(1.0x10^-7
Your pH of this substance is 7, which if you check the chart is pure water.
This shows which pH number changes the the color of the litmus paper
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