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Secret Life of Bees: Rosaleen Daise

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kelly pham

on 24 April 2014

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Transcript of Secret Life of Bees: Rosaleen Daise

Text evidence #1 ~ Chapter 1

In the beginning of the book Lily claims that there are bees living in her bedroom wall. Rosaleen says, "Bees swarm before death."
(page 2)

This was her warning to Lily before she does something she shouldn't.I think that Rosaleen said that to warn Lily not to wake T.Ray while he slept. Rosaleen saying this was suppose to Provoke Lily from waking him up but she did anyways. T.Ray got mad because Lily woke him up for what to him was nothing.
Rosaleen Daise

This shows character development in Rosaleen because we saw her character as not fun or adventurous. From this event we may guess that there is more to Rosaleen than we thought. Rosaleen is complex because now we know she has two sides.
Secret Life of Bees
Sue Monk Kidd

p. 264: “’Oh, Lily,’ she said, and there was a gentleness in her words, like they’d been rocked in a little hammock of tenderness down in her throat. ‘Why would I go and hurt you with something like that?’”
Signing of the Civil Rights Act
p. 53: “I saw the lightbulb snap on in Rosaleen’s face then, the flash of recognition. ‘Oh,’ she said. ‘I get it. You ran off ‘cause of what your daddy said about your mother. It didn’t have nothing to do with me in jail. And here you got me worrying myself sick about you running away and getting in trouble over me, and you would’ve run off anyway. Well, ain’t it nice of you to fill me in.’”
p. 29: “’This is my mama,’ she said.
The finish was rubbed off the sides of the picture where her thumbs had held it. Her shelf had to do with a religion she's made up for herself, a mixture of nature and ancestor worship. She'd stopped going to the House of Prayer Full Gospel Holiness Church years ago because it started at ten in the morning and didn't end until three in the afternoon, which is enough religion to kill a full-grown person, she'd said.
T. Ray said Rosaleen’s religion was plain wacko, and for me to stay out of it. But it drew me to her to think that she loved water rocks and woodpecker feathers, that she had a single picture of her mother just like I did.”
The Water Fight
Pg. 168
Pg. 282
Page 32: "Coming alongside the men, Rosaleen lifted her snuff jug, which was filled with black spit, and calmly poured it across the tops of the men's shoes, moving her hand in little loops like she was writing her name - Rosaleen Daise - just the way she'd practiced. "
Page 20; "I had to get the news from the TV man. 'Today, July second, 1964,' he said, 'the president of the United State signed the Civil Rights Act into law in the East Room of the White House.... I looked over at Rosaleen, who sat there shaking her head mumbling, 'Lord have mercy,' just looking so disbelieving and happy, like people on television when they answered the $64,000 Question."
Weather Queen

Pg. 75
"Now I could see she was returning to herself, looking like an all- weather queen out there, like nothing could touch her."
This passage provokes the reader to think of Rosaleen as trustworthy and the decision maker because a weather forecaster is usually trustful and a leader to the other followers. Rosaleen's character is usually the one who stays back and lets Lily do all the talking, with this passage, you get a small insight of her owning her own moment and doesn't let anyone step in her way.
The river scene in general is a very significant point in the book. Specifically, the passage above. For the entire book up until this event, we see Rosaleen treated as if she were subordinate to Lily, and accepting it. Like her being T. Ray and Lily’s household “worker,” and more precisely, in her following Lily’s plan to head to Tiburon. Her clarifying that she understands Lily only ran off because of T. Ray develops her character because of the shift in power. Before this fight, Lily was calling all the shots. Now, we can tell that Rosaleen doesn’t like being treated this way, and becomes angry when she realizes it. In a sense, the power Lily possesses falters at her statements.
Text evidence #2
Text evidence #3
This specific line reveals a side of Rosaleen we don't see as often as others, and that is her tact. Throughout the book, we observe Lily wishing Rosaleen had better manners, and wishing she would act differently. However, in this scene, things are different. Since Rosaleen kept the information about Lily's mother to herself, it tells us that she thought about how it would affect Lily, and chose not to say it because of the way Lily would react. This also reveals how much she cares about Lily.
The fact that Rosaleen has only a picture of her mother left really connects her to Lily, as we see in the last line. Sue Monk Kidd put this in the story to show us how alike the two are. I believe the picture is symbolic of Lily and Rosaleen’s relationship. How they are so different, but really very similar. The fingerprints on the side of the photo represent their struggles and anticipation—for Lily, the pain of her mother and T. Ray, and for Rosaleen, the darkness of that time and her situation. Rosaleen’s mother herself is emblematic of the differences that divide them (such as race, age, etc.) and also that of the subtle similarities. How each have endured hardships, how each have got only each other. As a whole, the picture is the complexity Rosaleen and Lily share.
Rosaleen as a Mother
Page 261: "I woke to Rosaleen's big hands shaking me and opened my eyes to a terrible brightness. Her face was bent over mine, the scent of coffee and grape jelly coming from her mouth. 'Lily!' she yelled. 'What in Sam Hill happened here?' ... I got to my feet, waiting for her to brawl me out, but she took her thick fingers and struggled to pluck the piece of glass from my arm. 'You need some Mercurochrome on this before you get infected,' she told me. 'Come on'."
In this passage it reveals that Rosaleen is adamant of the Civil Rights Act, which provokes her to make the decision that she wants to vote. But, Rosaleen doesn't think about the consequences of voting, she just keeps her eyes on the prize. This shows Rosaleens carelessness and stubbornness as she dives into things without a moments thought.
In this instance Rosaleen is trying to help Lily get over the time that she through the honey jars. While reading this quote it shows Rosaleen's significance as a mother to Lily. At this point in the book it seemed as if Rosaleen was not as much of a mother as August, but bringing her back, especially at a time when Lily needs someone the most, shows the importance of Rosaleen as a mother in Lily's life.
"Sunlight hit the hair sheen on her braids and lit them up."
At first, when the character of Rosaleen was introduced we saw her as always being behind and now she has more freedom and ways to express herself. During the water fight, she laughs, jokes and plays around. This Rosaleen before would only be watching others, and she would stay behind. Being in the pink house has let her gain confidence now that she sees other woman of color being powerful and confident.
On the Way to Voting
"She let out a laugh that made her whole body shake.It looked like all the flowers on her dress were bobbing in a gust of wind."
This passage uses a simile to describe the happiness Rosaleen has for being able to finally finish what she started, which was voting. Rosaleen has gone through a journey of learning about herself and her limits. She had set a goal when she was introduced in the beginning of the book, which was being able to vote. Going after her goal, she has learn her limits and how much she can accomplish when her confidence is gained.
The fact that Rosaleen is pouring snuff juice on the mens' shoes shows that she despises them, but the addition of the color being black adds more cruelty to the situation. Additionally, Rosaleen pours it calmly, meaning that she is certain of what she is doing. Also, moving her hand in little lops proves that she is having fun; that she is enjoying it.
After Escaping from Jail
Page 48: "'Shitbucket, hellfire, damnation, and son of a mother bitch,' said Rosaleen, laying into each word like it was sweet potatoes on her tongue."
In this scene I believe that Rosaleen is trying to express her feelings; how she feels in that moment. Having the freedom of not being in jail releases causes Rosaleen to express herself the way that she did. The fact that it's like 'sweet potatoes on her tongue shows that she is grateful; that she is happy to be out of jail.
Moving into May's Room
Page 129:"I'd been gone two slim hours, and our whole living arrangement had been overturned. 'How come you get to sleep over there?' I asked her. 'Cause May gets scared at night by herself.' Rosaleen was going to sleep in the extra twin bed, get the bottom drawer of May's dresser for her stuff, and have the bathroom at her fingertips."
" Glancing back, i saw Rosaleen holding the pie pan in her hand, missing the whole point."
" Rosaleen glided along, gathering rain in a pan and flinging it out like a child would do." (page 75)
"Baby, baby, where did our love go"
"For fourth of July they're holding a voters' ally at the colored church. I'm registering myself to vote." (page 27)
You might think that Rosaleen is moving into the house for herself, but really she is doing it for Lily. Leaving Lily by herself in the honey house shows that Lily is growing up. On the other hand this passage shows Rosaleens feelings for May. Also this could mean that Rosaleen feels that her time is done helping Lily, and now it is time to help May.
This shows symbolism that Rosaleen is a strong, independent woman. During this time period, there was segregation which made things hard for Rosaleen. On top of that, Rosaleen was a woman without a husband and woman had almost no rights. Her voting symbolize that she is strong being by herself, she doesn't need anyone.
Perception of Rosaleen: Sassy, independent, strong The picture says it all
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The End
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