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ENGLISH: Day 1. Rhetorical Strategies. How To Tame A Wild Tongue

EQ: How does Gloria AnzalÚa’s use of rhetorical strategies persuade and inform readers of “How To Tame A Wild Tongue"?
by

Alex Winninghoff

on 2 January 2013

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Transcript of ENGLISH: Day 1. Rhetorical Strategies. How To Tame A Wild Tongue

How do we use our language to persuade people? How do authors persuade their readers by the way they write? ESSENTIAL QUESTION: Looking Deeply At The Language Of A Text Cornell Notes Learning Target RI.9-10.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Common Core Reading Standard It is often just as important to understand how a speaker/writer is communicating as it to understand what they are communicating. To be a strong thinker and a good citizen, you must be able to think critically and independently. Being a critical, independent thinker allows you to make good decisions as a voter, consumer, and learner. To be college and career ready, you must be able to closely analyze everything you read and hear. Why learn about rhetorical strategies? DO NOW Rhetoric: The art of speaking and writing effectively Rhetorical Strategy Aristotle’s Rhetorical Triangle Aristotle believed that speakers could observe how communication happens and use that understanding to develop convincing arguments. In order to do that, speakers needed focus on three elements: Who the speaker is, the subject of the discussion, and who the audience is. SPEAKER AUDIENCE SUBJECT The three elements are
connected and interdependent It is often just as important to understand how a speaker/writer is communicating as it to understand what they are communicating. To be a strong thinker and a good citizen, you must be able to think critically and independently. Being a critical, independent thinker allows you to make good decisions as a voter, consumer, and learner. To be college and career ready, you must be able to closely analyze everything you read and hear. So again, why learn
about rhetoric? ETHOS PATHOS LOGOS An appeal based on the character, credibility, or reliability of the speaker or writer An emotional appeal, appeals to an audience's needs, values, and emotions. An appeal to reason that is based in logic. Logos often depends on introducing new logical reasoning that the listener/reader has not thought of, or explaining logical reasoning that the listener/reader already understands. The efforts made by speakers and authors to persuade or inform listener and readers. Rhetorical strategies describe the different ways to persuade. Before deciding which rhetorical strategy to use in any specific situation, a speaker or writer needs to consider the topic, the audience, and the subject. Appeal A serious, and often urgent request Write a brief paragraph about a time you tried to persuade someone to do something. Maybe you wanted a parent to buy you something or perhaps you were trying to talk a friend into something. How did you try to persuade them? What kind of language did you use? Did it work? Who, on television, do we see working to persuade us, the viewers? ETHOS PATHOS LOGOS Flip over your notes, and make a rhetorical appeal cheat sheet. You will refer to this often throughout the unit, and on the unit text. Ethical appeal Emotional appeal Logical appeal How does the author's/speaker's character matter? How does their authority influence you? How do they have credibility, or how do they rely on the credibility of others? WORTHY OF RESPECT Is the author/speaker trying to manipulate your emotions? Do you feel sadness, empathy, guilt, joy, amused, etc.? Do they use strong words that are emotionally driven? CHANGES HOW YOU FEEL Do they persuade you with reasoning? Do they emphasize logic? Do they offer you cold, hard facts? Do they give evidence to support their point or thesis? DO YOU KNOW THE FACTS
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