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Hatchet Survival Guide: Tips on How to Survive in the Canadian Wilderness

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Janis Probert

on 15 December 2013

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Transcript of Hatchet Survival Guide: Tips on How to Survive in the Canadian Wilderness

Hatchet Survival Guide: Brian's Tips on How to Survive in the Canadian Wilderness
13 year old Brian Robeson crashes in a plane after his pilot dies of a heart attack. Now he must survive in the Canadian Wilderness with nothing but himself, and a hatchet his mother gave him.
Tip #1: Always Have Food
Brian learned that having food is very important when trying to survive the Canadian Wilderness. He learned that food drives all creatures in the forest. He learned this when a skunk came into his shelter and dug up the turtle eggs he had buried. He tried to make the skunk go away, but the skunk got scared and sprayed him. He solved his problem by weaving a door to keep animals out of his food. He also stored his food in a tightly woven box. Since he could not store fish in a box, he made a corral to trap them. Then he realized he needed to be able to hunt to get more food. So he used his hatchet to make a bow and arrow and some spears to hunt animals. He then was able to eat "foolbirds", fish, and rabbits. He also found "gut cherries", raspberries, nuts, and turtle eggs.
Tip #2: Always Have a Fire
Tip #3: Not Everything is Out to Get You
Brian learned this lesson when he found some raspberry bushes. He was overjoyed because this was the first food he had eaten that he had known what is was and knew that it was edible. He was picking away very excitedly when he saw a huge black bear picking from the same raspberry bushes as he was. Brian could not move or do anything but stare at the bear. The bear studied Brian for a moment, then went on to his left eating berries. Brian could not speak, but he made a low "Nnnnnnggg" sound. "It made no sense, was just a sound of fear." Then he all of a sudden just started running in the other direction away from the bear. Then he suddenly stopped, he had realized something. He had realized that if the bear wanted him it would have taken him. Brian was not causing any harm to the bear, so the bear had no reason to cause him harm. In some other cases animals just do weird things like when a moose came out of nowhere and tried to drown Brian. It had no reason but still attacked Brian. This is how Brian learned this lesson.
Tip #5: Always Have Hope
Tip #4: Find a Shelter
Brian learned this tip by accident when he threw his hatchet at a porcupine and hit a stone. He saw a spark when his hatchet hit the stone. He later realized the stone was flint. This sparked the idea of how to get a fire without a match. He tore up a $20 bill and gathered twigs and branches, but that still wasn't enough to start a fire. So he went to look for something more flammable and he found a birch tree and pulled off the bark. Then he made a "nest" on the stone with all of the stuff he gathered and struck it with the hatchet and was able to make a fire. He then kept it going for many days because it gave him warmth, and he could cook his game with it. It also kept animals from coming into his shelter. Every morning he went to gather wood to make sure that the fire did not run out. This is how Brian learned this important lesson.

Brian learned this lesson when he had first landed in the crash. He had just woken up and all of a sudden, all of these incessant mosquitoes started to bite him. Brian could do nothing about it. Then all of a sudden, the sun moved off of him, and so did the mosquitoes. So he decided he would build himself a lean to with wood and a sturdy tree. While he was looking for a sturdy tree, he found a stone ridge. He looked at it for a while and found that it had part of it scooped out and it had an overhang. He decided it would be a better shelter than he would be able to make himself. The shelter was waterproof so it kept him safe from storms and would keep him safe from any large animal that would try to get in to his shelter.
Brian learned this lesson when a search plane came right over him when he was cutting down a limb. He had a signal fire ready to go but he was too late. The plane turned around as soon as he got his fire going. He then had no hope, "he could not play the game without hope." He did not want to live anymore. He spent whole night thinking "clouddown, clouddown." He even tried to end it all by cutting himself with the hatchet, but in the morning when he saw the blood on his hatchet he hated himself for doing what he had done to himself. Then he realized that he would survive here for the rest of his life in the wilderness. "He had died and been born as the new Brian." He would not let death in again.
Hatchet Survival Guide
By Julie Probert

GROUSE
RUFFED
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