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Literary Terms Weeks 16-20

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Claire Nightingale

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of Literary Terms Weeks 16-20

Literary Terms Weeks 16-20
Lament/ Lamentation
a song, poem or piece of music expressing grief, regret or mourning.
Motif
A recurrent thematic element in an artistic or literary work.
Onomatopoeia
is a word that imitates the sound it represents.
Prologue
is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. The Greek prologos included the modern meaning of prologue, but was of wider significance, embracing any kind of preface, like the Latin praefatio. The prologue is usually in the beginning of a book.
Prose
is writing that resembles everyday life
Literary Criticism
the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature.
Logos
Logic
Modernism
describes an array of cultural movements rooted in the changes in Western society in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The term covers a series of reforming movements in art, architecture, music, literature and the applied arts which emerged during this period.
-ment
Latin
a means, product, act, state
Metaphor
comparison of two unlike things using the verb "to be" and not using like or as as in a simile.
Ir-
not
irregular, irrational, irredeemable
bereavement
Of Mice and Men
Cute cuddly animals that Lennie can't help but kill
Conch
Mood
The atmosphere that pervades a literary work with the intention of evoking a certain emotion or feeling from the audience. In drama, mood may be created by sets and music as well as words; in poetry and prose, mood may be created by a combination of such elements as SETTING, VOICE, TONE and THEME. The moods evoked by the more popular short stories of Edgar Allen Poe, for example, tend to be gloomy, horrific, and desperate.
Myth
Traditional story that is rooted in a particular culture, is basically religious and usually serves to explain a belief, a ritual, or a mysterious natural phenomenon.
Narrator
The voice telling a story.
Nonfiction
Prose writing that deals with real people, things, events, and places. Example: biography and autobiography
E-
out of, from
elect- (choose out of)
eject- (throw out)
-oid
Resembling, like-shaped

Asteroid, spheroid
Asteroid
Droid
Oxymoron
is putting two contradictory words together.
Parody
A satiric imitation of a work or of an author with the idea of ridiculing the author, his ideas, or work. The parodist exploits the peculiarities of an author's expression--his propensity to use too many parentheses, certain favorite words, or whatever. The parody may also be focused on, say, an improbable plot with too many convenient events.
Paradox
reveals a kind of truth which at first seems contradictory. Two opposing ideas.
Pathos
Emotions (Greek)
En-/ Em-
In
Empathy
Empathy
Embarrassed
Energy
-or
-er
one who takes part in
proctor, doctor, actor, teacher, driver
Point of View
The way a story gets told and who tells it. It is the method of narration that determines the position, or angle of vision, from which the story unfolds. Point of view governs the reader's access to the story.
First person (t
he narrator speaks as "I" and the narrator is a character in the story who may or may not influence events within it).
Third-person narrative
(the narrator seems to be someone standing outside the story who refers to all the characters by name or as he, she, they, and so on). When the narrator reports speech and action, but never comments on the thoughts of other characters, it is the dramatic third person point of view or objective point of view.
omniscient-
-a narrator who knows everything that needs to be known about the agents and events in the story, and is free to move at will in time and place, and who has privileged access to a character's thoughts, feelings, and motives.
limited--
a narrator who is confined to what is experienced, thought, or felt by a single character, or at most a limited number of characters.
unreliable narrator
(a narrator who describes events in the story, but seems to make obvious mistakes or misinterpretations that may be apparent to a careful reader). Unreliable narration often serves to characterize the narrator as someone foolish or unobservant.
Protagonist
Main character in fiction or drama
Puns
the usually humorous use of a word in such a way as to suggest two or more of its meanings or the meaning of another word similar in sound.
Personification
is giving human qualities to animals or objects.
Hyper-
over :
hypertension, hypersensitive, hyperactivity
Hypertension
Hyperactivity
-sis
act, state, condition of: analysis
Analysis
Dialysis
Paralysis
Realism
in the visual arts and literature is the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life, whithout embellishment or interpretation
Rhyme
Repetition of accented vowel sounds, and all sounds following them, in words that are close together in a poem
Round Character
A round character has depth and detail that he or she seems like a "real" person. The round character changes or evolves over the course of a narrative or appears to have the capacity for such change, the character is also dynamic.
Satire
A literary tone used to ridicule or make fun of human vice or weakness, often with the intent of correcting, or changing, the subject of the satiric attack
Mal- / Male-
bad, evil
malediction malevolent, malnutrition , maleficence
Maleficence
malnutrition
malevolent
malediction
-ive
of, belonging to, quality of: Latin
furtive, attentive, relative
furtive
relatives
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