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Romanticism

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manuel torres

on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of Romanticism

DURING the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country ; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was - but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me - upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain - upon the bleak walls - upon the vacant eye-like windows - upon a few rank sedges - and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees - with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium - the bitter lapse into everyday life - the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart - an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it - I paused to think - what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher ? It was a mystery all insoluble ; nor could I grapple with the shadowy fancies that crowded upon me as I pondered. I was forced to fall back upon the unsatisfactory conclusion, that while, beyond doubt, there are combinations of very simple natural objects which have the power of thus affecting us, still the analysis of this power lies among considerations beyond our depth. It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression ; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down - but with a shudder even more thrilling than before - upon the remodelled and inverted images of the gray sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows. Romanticism
1825-1865 A Psalm of Life &
The Fall of the House of the Usher Novels The Scarlet Letter The House of Seven Gables How is it Romantic? The Psalm of Life Initial Paragraph Authors of Romanticism Neoclassicism What is
Romanticism? Romanticism
is a response to Neoclassicism
but it was a mixture of many emotions such as: TELL me not, in mournful numbers,
Life is but an empty dream ! —
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.

Life is real ! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal ;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul.

Not enjoyment, and not sorrow,
Is our destined end or way ;
But to act, that each to-morrow
Find us farther than to-day.

Art is long, and Time is fleeting,
And our hearts, though stout and brave,
Still, like muffled drums, are beating
Funeral marches to the grave. A psalm of life has the general ideals of Romanticism as it applies a deep emphasis on emotion and life. Appeals to human emotion because Hester Prynne has to carry the burden of the Scarlet Letter alone. The novel includes the topics of: gloom, horror, and mystery. Hawthorne explores the themes of guilt, retribution, and atonement.

In Hawthorne's novel, he confronts the moral and emotional experience of magic. The theme deals with a collection of short stories that all tie in with the same theme which is dark and Gothic Edgar Allan Poe
master at the use of suspense and horror.
-The Fall of the House of Usher
-The Raven
-The Tell-Tale Heart Nathaniel Hawthorne Most memorable for short stories that emphasize complexity of moral choices.
-The Scarlet Letter http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=251203 Hawthorne's theme constantly revolves around guilt sin and evil which to him are the inherent natural qualities of human nature which perfectly fits into the dark, Gothic and greatly exaggerated Romanticism I.
In the greenest of our valleys,
By good angels tenanted,
Once a fair and stately palace -
Radiant palace - reared its head.
In the monarch Thought's dominion -
It stood there !
Never seraph spread a pinion
Over fabric half so fair.
II.
Banners yellow, glorious, golden,
On its roof did float and flow;
(This - all this - was in the olden
Time long ago)
And every gentle air that dallied,
In that sweet day,
Along the ramparts plumed and pallid,
A winged odor went away.
III.
Wanderers in that happy valley
Through two luminous windows saw
Spirits moving musically
To a lute's well-tunéd law,
Round about a throne, where sitting
(Porphyrogene !)
In state his glory well befitting,
The ruler of the realm was seen.
IV.
And all with pearl and ruby glowing
Was the fair palace door,
Through which came flowing, flowing, flowing,
And sparkling evermore,
A troop of Echoes whose sweet duty
Was but to sing,
In voices of surpassing beauty,
The wit and wisdom of their king. V.
But evil things, in robes of sorrow,
Assailed the monarch's high estate ;
(Ah, let us mourn, for never morrow
Shall dawn upon him, desolate !)
And, round about his home, the glory
That blushed and bloomed
Is but a dim-remembered story
Of the old time entombed.
VI.
And travellers now within that valley,
Through the red-litten windows, see
Vast forms that move fantastically
To a discordant melody ;
While, like a rapid ghastly river,
Through the pale door,
A hideous throng rush out forever,
And laugh - but smile no more. In the world's broad field of battle,
In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle !
Be a hero in the strife !

Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant !
Let the dead Past bury its dead !
Act,— act in the living Present !
Heart within, and God o'erhead !

Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,
And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time ;

Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.

Let us, then, be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate ;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait. Henry Wadsworh Longfellow interprets the human life as a great journey that will have a positive ending even though life is to be thought as difficult by most romantic writers during this time period. The Fall of the House of Usher -The Minister's Black Veil Emotion
Medieval
Non-con/ optimistic
Nature
carry viewer/ reader away The Deerslayer "here i am, and there is the sun. One is not more true to the laws of natur' than the other has proved true to his word. I am your prisoner; do with me what you please. My buisness with man and 'arth is settled; nothing remains now but to meet the white man's God, accordin' to a white man's duties and gifts" Deerslayer has been captured by the enemy and shows that he has no fear of death in the hands of the enemy and is portrayed as a brave and bold individual and also emphasizes the importance of nature as being equal to man. Forms of
Romantic Art mystery
sadness
happiness
darkness
horror •Classical
•Unemotional
•Liberty
•Fraternity
•Equality VS.
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