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Observation, Hypothesis, Analysis, and the Use of Rhetoric.

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by

Jaysen Niedermeyer

on 17 September 2013

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Transcript of Observation, Hypothesis, Analysis, and the Use of Rhetoric.

Observation, Hypothesis, Analysis, and the Use of Rhetoric.
a rhetorical analysis of Stephen Goulds':
Sex, Drugs, Disasters, and the Extinction of the Dinosaurs
By Jaysen
Main Rhetorical Tool:
LOGOS
The rigorous logic used in formulating and implementing this tool is set apart from the public connotations of the scientific method In “Sex, Drugs, Disasters, and the Extinction of the Dinosaurs” when Stephen Jay Gould uses logic to explain how science based on observation and inquiry is much more credible and logical than “science” based on speculation and biased opinions.
Examples
of
Logos
Exigence: the connotation of the scientific method is decaying




Constraints: producing an easy to understand rendition of complex concepts
“The Alvarez hypothesis bore immediate fruit. Based originally on evidence from two European locales...”
Observation
Based
Inference

presentation of the lack of logos in theories not concieved in the scientific method
SEX
DRUGS
LOGIC:
DISASTERS
Full transcript