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Bridging the Gap Between Communication and Behavior

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Emily Maxwell

on 1 July 2015

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Transcript of Bridging the Gap Between Communication and Behavior

Bridging the Gap Between Communication and Behavior
Erin Farrer and Emily Maxwell

Behavior Basics
Communication
Receptive
Expressive
Cables
“The fact is that people are good, give people affection and security, and they will give affection and be secure in their feelings and their behavior.”
-Abraham Maslow
Means of Communication
What works for the student?
The hundreds of cables that hold the road deck could damage the bridge by vigorous shaking caused by slow winds
How?...Expressive
How?..... Receptive
...Elements of Good Communication
Why and How?
Behavior = Communication!
Conversations you have had...?
Are
WE
communicating?
Avoid the fly-swatter effect!!!
The key is to find options in meaningful ways to communicate AND meaningful communication..... (follow-up video)
Steel Chimney
It is not gusting that makes the cables move but a phenomenon called vortex shedding
Vortex Shedding
Vortex Shedding
Slow winds creates alternating low-pressure vortexes on the downstream side of the object. The object will tend to move toward the low-pressure zone.
Different pressures result in the movement of the cables
Helical Spring Shape
A helical strake is attached to most of the steel chimneys
The helical strake on this steel chimney reduce drastically the effect of vortex shedding
Back to cables
All cables that hold the deck of the bridge also have this helical shape to prevent vortex shedding
Low Tech
High Tech
.
Review
Reference
Thank You
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rio%E2%80%93Antirrio_bridge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vortex_shedding
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/pend.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incense_of_India
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammock
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquefaction
Behavior is Communication
Elements of Good Communication
So how do we address behaviors and communication?
Helical Shape
Functions of Behavior
Escape/avoidance
Get/obtain activity or attention (to connect)
Automatic or self-regulatory (coping)
Reasons for Behavior issues (From "Ain't Misbehavin'")
Unpredictability
Learned Behavior
Quality of Life
Predictability:
Routines need to have a beginning and an end
Students need to be able to understand what is expected of them
Use consistent responses
Refer to topic of routine frequently
Routines must have MEANING!
Learned Behavior:
Students will communicate with us.
All behavior is communication.
When negative behavior does not produce the result the student wants, that behavior may decrease
The student needs to be able to communicate “I don’t want” as well as “I want”.
Always replace one behavior with another.
Quality of Life:
Increase quality of life by offering choices.
Always respect and acknowledge the student’s choice.
Ensure activities and routines are meaningful to the student.
Implement as many motivating and enjoyable activities in routines as you can.
Always ask yourself “What would I be getting out of this activity if I were the student”?
Positive, negative, and everything in between!
ABCs of Behavior- 3 term contingency
Respect the communication
Don't expect to eliminate behaviors - replace!
"People don't change their behavior unless it makes a difference for them to do so." - Sharon Stone
Replacing Behavior/
Interventions
Make something happen
Stop something from happening
Provide information
Comment
Reactive vs. Voluntary
Social interaction
WHY???
Facial Expression
Vocalization
Body Movement
Touch and Reach
Extend object
Gesture/point
Sign/tactile sign
Speech
Writing
Touch cues
Gestures
Environmental cues
Landmarking cues
Sign Language
Speech
Mutual Respect
Emotional Comfort
Physical comfort
Topic of mutual interest
Does the
STUDENT
have a meaningful way to communicate?
Examples of behaviors from you
Our example... but first- a little background
Interventions can happen at each of the points in the contingency
Always need to have a replacement behavior
Equally rewarding
Equal or less effort
Must HONOR THE FUNCTION
Be prepared for an “extinction burst”
Track and monitor progress
Change intervention as needed
What did you see?
So what?
Stress Study
Dr. Cathy Nelson &
Dr. Robin Greenfield
Functions
Behavior
Communication
Refuse
Obtain
Social
Information
Escape/Avoidance
Get/obtain an item/activity or preferred stimulus
Automatic/self-stimulatory
Objectives
Behavior
Communication
Tying the two together
video
Activity.....
What are some means for communication you are supplying your students with?
Examples!!!
Objects
Pictures
Line drawings
Written schedules
Choice boards
Eye gaze
Voice output devices
Dynavox
iPad w/apps
Switches
Eagle eyes
Text to speech/speech to text
The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing
"Forget about cognition without rapport." - Dr. Jan Van Dijk
Recognize attempts to communicate
Intervene
Provide appropriate means of communication
= decrease in inappropriate behavior, increase in communication and appropriate behavior
Some things from the video:

Wait time!
Self-determination
Anticipation
1) environmental strategies such as meaningful and motivating activities, taking turns, and making choices;
2) anticipatory strategies, such as cues and calendar systems; and
3) calming strategies, such as bringing the child to midline, deep touch, and using a soothing voice.
"The researchers hope that a major application of the results will be to help teachers examine what they are doing to ensure that activities are meaningful, students are actively engaged and motivated, and that students are given a way to know what’s going on and what’s coming up. It is hoped that the study will encourage teachers to carefully consider whether certain classroom practices and routines might be causing stress in their students.."
Research Update: Stress and Children who are Deaf-Blind
by Maurice Belote, Project Coordinator
Communication Intervener Training
January 24, 2014


Elements of Communication
Sender
Receiver
Means or mode of expression
Topic
Share an experience you had this morning with your neighbor and identify the elements
Share an experience you've had with your student and identify the elements
Follow the topic
Successful Interactions

Identify yourself
Prepare student for activity
Let them know what will happen
Respond
Immediately
Consistently
Provide opportunities to communicate
Provide consistent prompts, cues, and feedback
Wait time
Finish activity and indicate that you are finished
Good Conversation should...
Involve turn-taking between child and adult
Follow the child’s lead
Have a playful atmosphere
Model communication-
Commenting
Describing
Requesting information
Wisdom from Dr. Van Dijk
The goal in programming for individuals who are deaf-blind is "bringing the person to conversation."
Conversational dialogue is established and gradually becomes more sophisticated and symbolic
Turn-taking
Eliciting communication symbols
Distancing
Conversational
Movement-based
Resonance
Defined: Resonate= to evoke a feeling of shared emotion or belief
Encourage student to move from self-regulatory behaviors to more interactive ones
Join in the student’s behavior and develop it into turn-taking behavior
Respond to student’s actions as communication
Promote attention to and participation with others
Coactive Movement vs Coactive Manipulation
Extension of resonance
Follows child's lead, child follows your lead
Movements become chains/sequences
Start-stop form utilized
Chain can be altered
Response to alteration= communication
Only used as necessary
Hand under hand functional routines
Used to extend limited movements, patterns
Faded
Refuse, Obtain, Social, Information
How to Elicit.....
Activity
Full transcript