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SCHOLARLY SOURCES

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by

Amy Coughenour

on 14 March 2016

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Transcript of SCHOLARLY SOURCES

(Who wrote the source?)
(What does the source look like?)
(Who are the intended readers?)
Sources & Additional Reading
Author
Audience
Appearance
April 2015
Vol 32, No. 2
A quick definition
What are scholarly sources?
(How is the quality determined?)
Review
Scholarly sources are written by experts in their disciplines for an audience of other researchers and students in those same disciplines.

Another way to look at scholarly sources is to compare them to two other common types of sources: trade and popular.
SCHOLARLY SOURCES
Examples
(Why was the source written?)
Purpose
(What's in the source?)
Content
an expert in the subject (researcher, scholar, PhD)
credentials usually provided with the article
Scholarly
professional subject matter experts, industry leaders, sometimes staff writers
credentials usually provided with the article
Trade
journalists, staff writers, freelance writers, occasionally scholars
credentials usually not provided with the article
may be anonymous
Popular
other researchers, scholars, experts, professionals
university community
Scholarly
people within a specific profession, trade, or industry
Trade
general public
wide audience with varied interests
Popular
to share knowledge
to contribute to the research in a given subject
to communicate new ideas or theories
Scholarly
to share knowledge
to provide information about the industry (updates, news, etc.)
to contribute to the professional field
Trade
to share general information
to promote a particular point of view
to entertain
to make money for the publisher and sell items
Popular
types:
primary (original) research; literature reviews (secondary research); bibliographies
elements:
abstracts, discussion, references
language:
jargon and terminology specific to the subject
Scholarly
types:
may include primary (original) research; reports; industry trends; upcoming techniques/products; organizational news
elements:
discussion, may have a few references
language:
jargon and terms specific to the profession
Trade
types:
general interest; news; editorials and opinions; current events; personality gossip
elements:
short, tends to be subjective (contains opinions)
language:
no specialized jargon, general language
Popular
plain covers
may have charts, graphs, or tables
issues may have consecutive pagination throughout a volume (an issue continues the pagination from the previous issue)
few advertisements—most are related to conferences, job ads, other scholarly journals
Scholarly
covers are usually related to settings in trade, industry, or professions
may have color photos and illustrations
each issue in a volume will usually start over at page 1
several advertisements—most are related to specific trades, industries, and professions
Trade
colorful covers with headlines
may have color photos and illustrations
many advertisements--may not be related to the subject; instead, offer consumer products and goods or other ads/sales
Popular
many (but not all) are peer-reviewed; most (but not all) are edited by an editor or editorial board
provide notes, references, and/or bibliographies
published by academic presses or scholarly organizations
Scholarly
editorial review; some articles may be peer-reviewed
may provide notes or references, usually informally
published by corporate/commercial presses or professional organizations
Trade
editorial review
may not identify sources
while there may be “suggested readings,” there usually isn’t a defined reference list or bibliography
published by commercial presses or special interest groups
Popular
Popular
Trade
Scholarly
Colorado State University Libraries.
Popular Magazines vs. Trade Magazines.
vs. Scholarly Journals.
http://lib.colostate.edu/howto/poplr.html
Hunter Library. Western Carolina University.
Is it Scholarly, Trade, or a
Popular Publication?
http://researchguides.wcu.edu/scholarly
Stewart Library. Weber State University.
Scholarly vs. Popular vs. Trade
Publications.
http://library.weber.edu/il/libs1704/PDFs/scholarlyvspopular.pdf
How to locate scholarly sources? (1 of 5)
Go the journal’s homepage and find the “About” or “Aims and Scope” section to determine the purpose and audience of the journal.
How to locate scholarly sources? (3 of 5)
Use tools available in the catalog and databases to limit to peer-reviewed sources.
How to locate scholarly sources? (2 of 5)
Evaluate the source based on its elements:
Review
Content
Appearance
Author
Audience
Purpose
*
Op-ed pieces within scholarly journals aren’t the
same as scholarly research papers. They don’t go through the same processes and peer-review.
How to locate scholarly sources? (4 of 5)
Double-check sources found in Google Scholar
How to locate scholarly sources? (5 of 5)
Still unsure?
Ask a librarian for assistance. We're happy to help!
Google Scholar doesn’t have the ability to limit to peer-reviewed sources. All sources located via Google Scholar will need to be double-checked using source evaluation.
Chat: https://www.answerland.org/widget/concordia
Email: ask@cu-portland.libanswers.com
Text: 503.406.3055
Phone: 503.280.8507
Full transcript