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Presenting information visually

Part of the level 3 Award in First Line Management. This prezi aims to get participants thinking about how they can best communicate ideas for M3.09.
by

adam hart

on 9 May 2012

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Transcript of Presenting information visually

Presenting information visually Burnley has the cheapest homes to buy anywhere in England and Wales, according to a property website. Four out of five of the most affordable streets can be found in the Lancashire town, the poll by Mouseprice.com found. The cheapest homes were found on Angle Street, where the average property cost £32,400 in the last year. Earlier research by the website found that homes in Victoria Road in Kensington, west London, cost the most - averaging £6.4m. Compare the impact of text or a long list of information Top 10 Most Expensive Streets 2010.
Kensington Palace Gardens,
London W8
£18,236,2432.
The Boltons,
London SW10 £10,738,8993.
Frognal Way,
London NW3
£10,372,0224.
Compton Avenue,
London N6
£7,034,6215.
Courtenay Avenue,
London N6
£6,724,3976.
Cottesmore Gardens, London W8
£6,241,2197.
Victoria Road,
London W8
£5,814,4618.
Park Place Villas,
London W2
£5,791,1659.
Mulberry Walk,
London SW3
£5,713,70110.
Carlyle Square,
London SW3
£5,644,362 With a simple graphic There are a range of visual aids we can use to improve the impact of briefings & presentations Tables presenting data in rows and columns Comparison of simple data Should be designed to be clear
Limits the data that can be easily read Some design rules:
right alinged text
borders(?),
narrow rather than wide... When we want to see changes in data over time, line charts can be much clearer than tables Line charts also help to quickly compare data series with each other Line Charts Bar charts One of the most common methods of visual presentation More useful for comparing a number of items.
Can get an idea of trends over time. Can be presented horizontally, more useful for comparing differences at a specific point in time Pie charts shows relative size of things that make up the total most effective when there are a few slices, where difference in each is easy to judge with little information Line charts Pie charts Stacked charts Showing build up of specific series / criteria most effective with small number of slices, where difference in slice sizes is easy to judge. these visuals can help quickly communicate figures to your audience. and there are a number of other types of visual aids available... diagram Flow chart Key ideas diagram route cause diagram Or make up your own... as long as it gets across your message
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