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Managing Challenging Behaviors

How sensory strategies and behavior management principles can work together in the classroom.
by

Shannon Roberts

on 4 November 2013

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Transcript of Managing Challenging Behaviors

Sensory Avoiding
Sensory seekers
Four Ways to interpret sensory information
* The nervous system must be able to:
~Register sensory information-
~Modulate behavior-match behavior to
demands of sensory system
~Integrate sensory information
Sensory processing is the basis for all behavior
Autism & Behavior Management
Basics of Sensory Integration
How sensory strategies and behavior management principles can work together in the classroom.
Managing Challenging Behaviors
Sensory Strategies and Behavior Management In the Classroom
Facts
Basics of Behavior Management
Four Functions of Behavior:
1. Sensory...It feels good...or it drives me
crazy!
2. Tangible...I want something.
3. Social/Attention...You paid attention to
me!
4. Escape...I would rather get in trouble
than do what you just asked me to do!
Functions of Behavior
*
Reinforce the behavior you desire. Try
to ignore the behavior you want to
extinguish.
*
Only give choices you can live with.
*
Don't get into a debate. You won't
win!
*
Pick battles and set priorities.
* Sensory integration is the neurological management
and processing of sensory information we receive
through our sensory systems.

* SI gives us the ability to sift through all the information
we received and select what to focus

* SI allows us to act or respond to the situation we are
experiencing in a purposeful manner.

* Difficulties with SI is called Sensory Processing Disorder
or Sensory Integrative Dysfunction.

* Forms the underlying foundation for academic learning
and social behavior.
Pyramid of Learning
SEVEN senses
Vestibular Sense
Proprioception
Poor Registration
Sensitivity
Teacher Reports:
Teacher Reports:
Teacher Reports:
Teacher Reports:
Research shows increased attention when individuals were given preferred tangible reinforcers (snacks, coins) while performing boring tasks.

What does the classroom look like?
Is it too stimulating?

Front loading: give them signals for when they are getting ready to have a turn.

Self Monitoring

Use hands on activities

Relate material to the interest of the child.

Premack Schedule!

Look at length of nonpreferred activity.
SCHEDULE! Premack!

Reinforcement

Prediction

Length of Activity
Reinforcement Inventories

Is it ability?
(Is work too hard or too easy?)

Length of Activity

Premack Schedule

Visual Memory is generally an area of strength.

Memory for verbal material can be quite difficult. “I just told the class the directions. Were you listening??”
Fidgets: give them something to keep their hands busy

Social Stories

Reinforce for correct behavior (they aren't going to get better just because you want them to. : )

Self Monitoring

Schedules
~ 1:88 children identified with autism. (Compare that to the
Willard student body.) That is a 78% increase since 2007.

~ ASDs are almost 5 times more common among boys (1
in 54) than among girls (1 in 252).

~ Three Different Types of ASD's
Autistic Disorder
Asperger Syndrome
Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified
Some research indicates that ADHD falls under the umbrella of ASD

~ Begins before the age of 3 and lasts throughout a person's life.

~ Diagnosing ASDs can be difficult since there is no medical
test.

~ There is currently no cure for ASDs.
How do you tell the difference?
Behavior or Sensory?
It is sensory if...
It is behavior if...
Fussy, resistant to change, reliant on rigid rituals.

These children have low thresholds for sensory information and actively try to avoid information they are sensitive to.
Distractible, active, continuously engaging, fidgety, excitable
These children have high thresholds for sensory input and actively seek out sensory information throughout their day.
The brain is craving stimulus and is attending to too many things.
Quiet, uninterested, withdrawn, overly-tired
self-absorbed, dull affect
These children have a high threshold for sensory input, but do not actively seek out additional sensory information
Distractible, hyperactive, poor attention

These children are sensitive to stimuli due to low thresholds for sensory information but do not actively avoid those input.
Sensory based behaviors occur regardless of circumstances or people
Function of the behavior is to escape or avoid a sensory stimulus. (Melt down during assemblies/lunch/p.e.)
If a consistent carefully planned positive behavior plan doesn’t work, it’s sensory
Behavior described as controlling or manipulative may be sensory……or may not.
If the behavior only occurs with certain people, or is inconsistent, it is probably not sensory based.
It is behavior if a consistent positive behavior plan is successful in extinguishing the targeted behavior.
The Inattentive-
Distracted student
Student does not pay attention to teacher instruction
Difficulty with following multi-step commands
Frequently distracted by noise, other kids, movement
Does not get work done
Provide verbal cues or tactile cues before student is expected to participate or provide whole class information.
Provide written expectations, schedule or sequence of tasks student is expected to execute.
To increase overall body awareness and arousal, provide an unstable surface for sitting
Allow student to MOVE.
Brain gym, calisthenics, hand out materials in class, take information to office, or pick up needed materials.
Student is in constant motion
Has difficulty sitting still
Falls out of chair and falls more than other kids
Blurts out answers
Can’t keep hands to self
Constantly touching people/things
The Hyperactive-
Energetic Learner
Never take away recess/P.E. as a form of punishment for not finishing work
This child needs to MOVE and move often
Find natural movement breaks
Running errands to teacher -Erase board
Stacking chairs -Sharpen pencils
Explore seating options
Move-in-sit cushion -sitting on therapy ball
Choice of two positions -tennis balls on legs of chair
Theratubing on legs of chairs -T-stool
Put something in their mouth. Deep chewing/sucking input is calming
Provide appropriate fidgets to keep hands busy
Possible Sensory reason: Sensory seeker
Whole class movement
Transitions are an excellent time for animal walks, cross crawls, jumping
Pair this student with a child that appears to be less motivated to move or participate
Proprioceptive input throughout the day. Deep pressure or heavy work is calming to sensory system.
Animal walks, reading in prone, isometrics
Student is laying on their desk
Always last to turn in assignments
Has to be constantly reminded of what to do.
Handwriting is illegible
The Unmotivated-
Sedentary Learner
Never take away recess/P.E. as a form of punishment for not finishing work
This child needs to MOVE and move often
Find natural movement breaks
Running errands to teacher -Erase board
Stacking chairs -Sharpen pencils
Explore seating options
Move-in-sit cushion -sitting on therapy ball
Choice of tow positions: Tennis balls on legs of chair
Theratubing on legs of chairs -T-stool
Pair this student with a sensory seeker
Encourage this student to complete work in tall kneeling or standing positions.
Possible Sensory reason:
Poor Registration
When seated this student should have appropriate chair/desk height with hips/knees/ankles at 90
Poor core strength is possible in this student so whole class strengthening opportunities are encouraged.
Frequent breaks will be needed as endurance may be an issue.
Encourage climbing/swinging when on the playground
Student does not transition well between activities
Student has melt-downs when they don’t want to do something
Student refuses to participate in some activities
Works poorly in groups
The Stubborn-Emotionally reactive Learner
Keep this student separated from a hyper-active or energetic learner.
Sit student in front of the classroom to decrease number of distractions easily observable
Provide a study carrel for work times
Try head phones, ear plugs or “quiet area” during work times.
Try white noise to help student with filtering “non-important” auditory information.
Possible Sensory reason:
Sensory avoider
Plan-predict-remind this student about upcoming events.
Provide a safe place for this student.
Deep pressure is calming to nervous system.
Deep pressure done before challenging event may assist with tolerance of event.
Allow for frequent breaks out of the classroom.
Look for distractors
Sit student in front of the classroom to decrease number of distractions easily observable
Provide a study carrel for work times
Try head phones, ear plugs or “quiet area” during work times.
Try white noise to help student with filtering “non-important” auditory information.
Possible sensory reason: Sensory sensitivity
If your not sure whether it is sensory or behavior, provide appropriate sensory input non-contingently when behavior is not occurring.
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