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The Properties of Matter

Chapter 7
by

Jerry Allison

on 13 October 2016

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Transcript of The Properties of Matter

The Properties of Matter
The Properties of Matter
What Is Matter?
What Is Matter?
Matter
Matter and Volume
Matter and Mass
Inertia
Physical
Properties

Physical
Properties

Physical Properties
Physical Changes
Chemical
Properties
Chemical
Properties
Chemical Properties
New Substances
Physical vs. Chemical
The
Big
Idea
The
Big
Idea
Matter is described by its properties and may undergo changes.
Matter is described by its properties and may undergo changes.
What do you have in common with a toaster, a steaming bowl of soup, or a bright neon sign?
Matter is anything that has and
.
All matter takes up ________.
The amount of space taken up, or occupied, by an object is known as the object's _______.
Because matter takes up space, no two objects can occupy the __________

at the _________.
We can measure _____

volume.
We can measure the volume of a ________ shaped object
We can measure the volume of an __________ shaped object.
_______(L) and _________ (mL) are the units used most often to express the volume of liquids.
A _______________ is the most often used tool for measuring liquid volume.
An accurate measurement can only be made by reading the bottom of the ________ at eye-level.
The volume of a regularly shaped object is expressed in _____________.
Cubic means "having ______dimensions."
Cubic _____ (m ) and cubic _________ (cm ) are most often used to express the volume of solid objects.
The 3 in these measurements shows that three ________ or _________ were multiplied together to get the final result.
3
3
volume = length x width x height
You can measure the volume of irregularly shaped objects by measuring the volume of water they
displace
.
This is known as
Archimedes
' Principle.
Because 1 mL = 1 cm , the volume of the solid object can be expressed in
cubic centimeters
.
Although liquid volume
can
be expressed in cubic measurements, solid volumes should
never
be expressed in liters or milliliters.
3
Mass is the amount of _______ in an object.
The _____ matter the _____ mass.
The mass of an object remains the same _________ in the universe.
The only way to change the mass object is to change the ______________.
Mass and _______ are often used as though they mean the same thing. They do not!
Weight is a measure of __________ force exerted on an object.
The more _____ an object has the more _______pulls on the object.
The _____ gravity pulls the _____ weight.
The _____ gravity pulling on an object the _____ weight.

Inertia
is the tendency of an object to resist a change in motion.
An object at
rest
will remain at
rest
until something causes the object to move.
A
moving
object will keep
moving
at the same speed and in the same direction unless something acts on the object to change its speed or direction.
Mass
is a measure of inertia.
An object with a lot of mass is
harder
to get moving and harder to stop.
The reason is the object with the large mass has
greater
inertia.
What you will learn:
Describe the two properties of all matter.
Identify the units used to measure volume and mass.
Compare mass and weight.
Explain the relationship between mass and inertia.

SPI 0807.9.1 - Recognize that all matter consists of atoms.
What you will learn:
Describe the two properties of all matter.
Identify the units used to measure volume and mass.
Compare mass and weight.
Explain the relationship between mass and inertia.

SPI 0807.9.1 - Recognize that all matter consists of atoms.
Have you ever played 20 questions? The goal of this game is to figure out what object another person is thinking of by asking 20 yes/no questions or less.
A physical property of matter can be observed or measured without changing the matter's identity.
We use physical properties to identify matter.
Examples of Physical Properties:
Conductivity
State
Density
Solubility
Ductility
Malleability
Boiling point
Magnetism
Color
The ability of a material or substance that allows electricity or heat to flow through it easily. Most metals are good conductors.

All matter exists in one of four states: Solid, Liquid, Gas, or Plasma
Density is the mass per unit volume of a substance.
Solubility is the ability of a substance to dissolve in another substance.
Ductility is the ability of a substance to be pulled into a wire.
Malleability is the ability of a substance to be rolled or pounded into thin sheets.
The temperature at which a liquid changes into a gas.
Magnetism is a force of attraction or repulsion that exists between like and unlike poles.
Color describes the way an object reflects light.
A physical change is a change that affects one or more physical properties of a substance.
There is no new substance created during a physical change.
Many physical changes are easily reversed.
Examples of physical changes:
Crushing a can
Melting ice
Boiling water
Mixing sand and water
Breaking glass
Chopping wood
Mixing green and red marbles
Dissolving sugar in water
Shredding paper
Grade Level Expectation: Explain that matter has properties that are determined by the structure and arrangement of atoms (0807.9.2).

Objectives:
Describe two examples of chemical properties.
Explain what happens during a chemical change.
Distinguish between physical and chemical changes.

Bellringer: How is the rust different than the original metal?
Grade Level Expectation: Explain that matter has properties that are determined by the structure and arrangement of atoms (0807.9.2).

Objectives:
Describe two examples of chemical properties.
Explain what happens during a chemical change.
Distinguish between physical and chemical changes.

Bellringer: How is the rust different than the original metal?
How would you describe a piece of wood before and after it is burned? Has it changed color? Does it have the same texture? The original piece of wood changed, and physical properties alone can't describe what happened to it.
Chemical properties
describe matter based on its ability to change into new matter that has different properties.
Flammability
is the ability of a substance to burn.
Reactivity
is the ability of two or more substances to combine and form one or more new substances.
Physical properties
can
be observed without changing the substance.
Chemical properties
cannot
be observed without changing the substance.
Characteristic
properties are always the same no matter how much substance you have. These can be physical or chemical.
A chemical change happens when one or more substances are changed into
new
substances.
You can learn about the chemical
properties
of a substance by observing the chemical
changes
that take place.
The product of a chemical reaction has properties that are completely
different
than the original substances.
Signs of a chemical change:
Many chemical changes are hard to
reverse
.
The most important question to ask when determining whether a physical or chemical change happens is:
Did the composition change?
The
composition
of an object is the type of matter that makes up the object and the way that the matter is arranged in the object.
Physical changes
do not
change the composition of the object.
Chemical changes
change
the composition of the object.
It takes another
chemical
change to reverse a chemical change.
mass
takes up space
space
volume
same space
same time
liquid
regularly
irregularly
Liters
milliliters
graduated cylinder
meniscus
cubic units
three
meters
centimeters
quantities
dimensions
matter
more
more
everywhere
amount of matter
weight
gravitational
gravity
mass
more
less
more
less
You can measure the volume of irregularly shaped objects by measuring the volume of water they DISPLACE.

This is known as ARCHIMEDES Principle.

Because 1 ml = 1cm, the volume of the solid object is expressed in CUBIC CENTIMETERS

Although liquid volume CAN be expressed in cubic measurements, solid volumes should NOT be expressed in liters or milliliters.
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