Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

MARK ANTONY'S SPEECH AT CAESERS FUNERAL

No description
by

on 12 November 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of MARK ANTONY'S SPEECH AT CAESERS FUNERAL

MARK ANTONY'S EULOGY AT CAESERS FUNERAL
Summary of eulogy
In this speech, Mark Antony is put in a difficult position, since he is aware of the fact that the crowd is with the conspirators and he can’t show his disgust towards the conspirators because of his friendship with Caesar. Mark Antony begins his speech with the famous line ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;’ and throughout the speech, manages to sway the crowd against the conspirators through his rhetorical irony and strong emotion. He triggers the crowd’s guilt, emotion and sense of patriotism. At the end of the speech, Mark Antony has successfully swayed the crowd to his side and shown what a terrible sin the conspirators were so proud of making.
The Eulogy
Atmosphere /Mood
The Atmosphere that is created throughout this speech is ironic. Antony cleverly uses play on words and his rhetorical devices create a powerful and intense atmosphere. He slowly succeeds on turning the crowd against the conspirators since he appeals to the crowds logic, emotion, guild and sense of patriotism.

An example of Irony used
'For Brutus is an honorable man; so they are all, honorable men--'
By Aimilia, Hera, Thalia & Yolie
ANTONY
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interrèd with their bones.
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest—
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men—
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill.
Analysis: Part I
Friends, Romans, countrymen, give me your attention. I have come here to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do is remembered after their deaths, but the good is often buried with them. It might as well be the same with Caesar. The noble Brutus told you that Caesar was ambitious. If that’s true, it’s a serious fault, and Caesar has paid seriously for it. With the permission of Brutus and the others—for Brutus is an honorable man; they are all honorable men—I have come here to speak at Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, he was faithful and just to me. But Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. He brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms brought wealth to the city.
Part II
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept.
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And, sure, he is an honorable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause.
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me.
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.
Analysis:Part II
Is this the work of an ambitious man? When the poor cried, Caesar cried too. Ambition shouldn’t be so soft. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. You all saw that on the Lupercal feast day I offered him a king’s crown three times, and he refused it three times. Was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious. And, no question, Brutus is an honorable man. I am not here to disprove what Brutus has said, but to say what I know. You all loved him once, and not without reason. Then what reason holds you back from mourning him now? Men have become brutish beasts and lost their reason! Bear with me. My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, and I must pause until it returns to me.
Themes
-irony
-regicide
-great chain of being disturbed from harmony by killing the king
- foreshadowing bad events for Rome, and possibly the audience in the Elizabethan times
-consequences
-evil

Symbolism
Throughout this speech there are some of the finest examples of rhetorical irony at work, personifications, rhetorical questions and metaphors to emphasize the art of persuasion and to convey the strong emotions. There are many important images in Antony’s speech like the goddess of revenge let loose from Hell on Rome now that Caesar is dead, the fierce dogs ready to attack and the smell of rotting flesh emphasizing the evil of Caesar’s murder. They are all images and symbols used to foreshadow the catastrophe of Rome now that Caesar is dead. In this speech, there is iambic pentameter, ‘I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him’ which offers structure and fluidity. The themes of honor and ambition are emphasized here through the extensive use of metaphors, images and rhetorical questions such as ‘Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?’. All these literary devices are cleverly used to trigger the crowd’s emotion, guilt and sense of patriotism successfully.
Full transcript