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Literature-Based Instruction with English Language Learners

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on 20 October 2013

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Transcript of Literature-Based Instruction with English Language Learners

Notes
Poetry
Literature-Based Instruction with English Language Learners
levels of proficiency
Section Two – Growing in Language Ability
Section Three
Section four - Exploring Content

What types of nonfiction literature link language and content development?
• concept books
• photo essays
• life-cycle books
• activity, craft, experiment, and how-to books
• journals and diaries
• survey books
• informational storybooks
• browsing books
• trivia books, almanacs, account of strange and bizarre occurrences

Interdisciplinary literacy learning through literature-based instruction
Putting it all together, the positives of teaching a unit:

• helps English language learners comprehend the concepts presented
• increase in vocabulary
• students can get engaged with text
• class discussions
• cooperative nature of lessons
• practicing listening and speaking skills
• links to other areas of the curriculum

What do we have to do when we have an English Language Learner as a student?
• assess their language ability
• after being identified as a nonnative English speaker
o possible placement in bilingual education
• as they become more proficient they have more potential for reclassification or exit
• monitor student progress
• program evaluation

Section One - Beginning the Journey
Who are English Language Learners?

They are student who comes from a home where a language other than English is spoken. They can represent 25-60% of the student population in some districts.
What strategies are most effective in helping students acquire another language?
• focus on the ability to communicate
• comprehension precedes production
• production emerges in stages
• lower the affective filter of students


• speaks and understands little or no English
• has a limited English vocabulary
• may produce isolated phrases
• writing is very limited; writes simple sentences with direct assistance
• silent, not an active contributor in class
• generally just repeats after teacher, peers, or other speakers
• does not generate a great deal of original language
• uses fewest words possible or patterns
• uses gestures and facial expressions to indicate meaning
• dependent on others to translate and negotiate the school environment
• uses knowledge/comprehension level language – who, what, where
• language repertoire extremely limited and not germane to the topic
• language is very literal and factual; vocabulary is survival language
• uses speech-focused on “I/me “to get basic needs
Advanced-Level Proficiency
• hypothesis and engages in critical thinking skills
• able to judge against a standard – e.g., can use a rubric to assess an assignment
• able to self-edit language use
• engages in idea abstraction and talks about topics that are not concrete
• understands more complex forms of the English language
• able to do creative and expository writing in English

Beginning-level Proficiency
What approaches are most effective in helping English Language Learners start reading?

• reading aloud
• shared reading
• guided reading
• self-selected or silent sustained reading
• independent reading

• Did I take time to read aloud today?
• Did I provide time for sustained silent reading?
• Did I provide time for writing?
• Did I take time for talk?
• Did I show instead of tell in my lessons?
• Did I make connections between lessons and between subject areas?
• Did I provide opportunities for the children to learn from each other?
• Did I keep track of who is doing what?
• Did I have fun?

• matching or distinguishing
• transferring
• scanning
• extending
• condensing
• predicting
• problem-solving
• role playing
• show and tell
• choral reading
• chanting
• list poem read loud
• literature circles
• audio publishing
• collaborative learning activities
• round table
• panel discussion
• creative dramatics
• readers theater

What instructional strategies assist English language learners’ writing development?

• wide range of reading experiences
• present good pieces of writing as models for students
• spend considerable amount of time writing
• supply students with specific questions or criteria for evaluating writing
• engaging students in inquiry-based activities

English language learners need:

• time and opportunity to write
• real reason for writing
• genuine audience
• role models
• safe environment

Writing with an ELL student at the Beginning Proficiency Level
• getting acquainted with spelling and vocabulary
use alphabet books
concept books
• label your room
• create word walls
• post real-world print
• recording their dictated stories
• focus on the Dolch list of 220 frequently used words

focus on vocabulary associated with basic needs:
objects
colors
numbers
clothing
names
dates
nationality
biographical information
weather
seasons
family members

Use Language Experience Approach (LEA)
look at student needs and interests
choose a participatory activity
discuss the activity prior to the beginning
participate in the activity
lead the class in an oral reconstruction of the activity
have students write or dictate stories and record them

Teachers can have students:

copy or transcribe simple material
listing
identifying
labeling
filling our biographical information on forms
construct very simple paragraphs using memorized or familiar text
use sentence frame activities:
I like ____ but I don’t like _____.
I like ____ because ______.
I _____ and then I ______.

Writing with an ELL student at the Intermediate Proficiency Level

• they will correctly use upper and lower case
• come closer to using punctuation correctly
• begin to employ strategies to avoid errors
• they may limit their use of vocabulary to what they are certain about


teachers can:
be careful about focusing too much on errors and giving rules
avoid stressing correctness over content
use read alouds to help the class discuss the differences between oral and written language


• they will be writing about a wide variety of topics

teachers should:
provide practice in writing cohesive summaries
writing description and narration
taking notes
explaining point of view
paraphrasing

• Literacy Learning through Multicultural Literature

• Literacy Learning through Folklore

• Literacy Learning through Poetry

Biographies
• picture book biographies
• collective biographies
• complete biographies
• autobiographies and memoirs

Nonfiction Literature
What strategies engage English language learners with nonfiction literature and expository writing in textbooks?
lesson frameworks
directed reading thinking activity
KWL charts
text-preview techniques
survey technique
organizational walk-through
visual reading guide
discussion and response strategies
graphic organizers
structure overview or hierarchy
timelines
flowcharts
text structure maps
writing
journal
reference aids
graphs and charts
maps

A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"


The Marlup

Establish empathy
Think about language
Focus on what ELLs can do!
Appreciate the advantages of being bilingual/bicultural
Contact Information:
kmeacademy@gmail.com
www.kmeacademy.org


Conclusions

The passage reads...

A father was vacuuming his car. Suddenly a child tossed some dirt in his car. "Why did you toss dirt in my clean car?" the father asked the child.

"I'm awfully sorry," the child said.
"I thought you wanted dirt in your car.
Do you vacuum your car clean?"


If you substitute...



marlup = father pove = vacuum
kump = car parmily = suddenly
narg = child horp = toss
whev = dirt vump = you
frinkle = clean uf = ask
Er = I muvvily = awfully
trungy = sorry grup = say
hesh = think norple = want


A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"


The Marlup

What did the narg horp in the marlup's
kump?
2. What did the marlup juf the narg?
3. Was the narg trungy?
4. How does the marlup pove his kump?

Comprehension Questions

A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"


The Marlup

What did the narg horp in the marlup's
kump?
2. What did the marlup juf the narg?
3. Was the narg trungy?

Comprehension Questions

A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"


The Marlup

What did the narg horp in the marlup's
kump?
2. What did the marlup juf the narg?

Comprehension Questions

What did the narg horp in the marlup's
kump?

Comprehension Questions

A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"


The Marlup

Spanish
Portuguese
French
Malay

Word Sort

You have been given a word. Find other people with whom you can form a ‘group’.

Everyone in the group needs to be prepared to explain how your group was formed.

Open Word Sort

The questions that poultrymen face as they raise chickens from incubation to adult life are not easy to answer. Both farmers and merchants can become concerned when health problems such as coccidiosis may arise any time after the egg stage to later life. Experts recommend that young chicks get plenty of sunshine and nutritious food for healthy
growth. Banties and geese should not share the same barnyard or even sleep in the same roost. They may be afraid of the dark.

Answers

The questions that p____________ face as they raise
ch_______ from in________ to adult life are not easy to
an______. Both fa________ and m_________ can become concerned when health problems such as co___________ arise any time after the e__________ stage to later life. Experts recommend that young ch_________ should have plenty of s__________ and nutritious food for healthy growth. B________ and
g _______should not share the same b__________ or even sleep in the same r__________. They may be afraid of the d ___________.

Activity: Fill in the Blanks

That’s Me!

Professional development for general education teachers of migrant students and ELLs
2009-2010 Middle School Cohort
2010-2011 High School Cohort
2011-2012 Elementary Cohort




Kansas Migrant & ELL Academy

narg

marlup

What would have helped...

A, M, T, S, F

Add-on Story



Francie Christopher & Stephanie Christenot
KU Institute for Educational Research & Public Service

Addressing the Needs of English Language Learners

kump

pove

1. What did the narg horp in the marlup’s kump?
The narg horped some whev in the marlup’s kump.

2. What did the marlup juf the narg?
The marlup jufd “Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?”

3. Was the narg trungy?
Yes, the narg was muvvily trungy.

What approaches are most effective in helping English Language Learners start reading?
A Self-Assessment of Reading Teaching:
How can Teachers assist English language learners’ listening and speaking development?
How can teachers provide diverse models of language for students?
• live or recorded interviews
• newscasts
• speeches
• radio and television programming
• music
• storytelling of relating anecdotes
• live conversation and dialogue

Writing
Writing with an ELL student at the Advanced Proficiency Level
Literacy learning through multicultural literature
Reasons to teach Multicultural literature:

• enables all students to see themselves
• it is found across the genres
• it covers a broad spectrum of themes and topics
• it offers information and opportunities to see the world
• improvement in academic achievement

Folklore
Reasons to teach Folklore:

• to teach manners and social behaviors
• educate about the creation of the world
• history of its people
• moral values
• to entertain
Poetry
Reasons to teach poetry:

• poetry is musical and fun
• read aloud and choral reading promotes fluency
• the short lines appear manageable and are not intimidating to a reluctant or struggling reader
• rhythm
• repetition
• rhyme
• accents fall on meaningful words
• use as anticipatory set for introduction of concept or content across curriculum
• can help ELLs acquire a sense of sound of English words and phrases in artful, yet natural language
• still uses some awkward phrases and sentences
• does more hypothesis testing of the language – i.e., overgeneralizing rules
• writing involves translation from home language to English
• begins to use higher-level language, explaining how and why
• understands the structure of sentences and paragraphs in terms of superordinate/subordinate ideas
• demonstrates greater regularization with grammar
• generates information and organizes it into some logical sequence in writing
• is aware of formal and informal language
• demonstrates greater awareness of academic and textbook language
• still more concerned with communication not grammar
• begins to understand language that is more context reduced, more abstract
• still experiences some interference from first language
Intermediate-Level Proficiency
Questions
1. What did the narg horp in the marlup’s kump?

2. What did the marlup juf the narg?

3. Was the narg trungy?

the Marlup
A marlup was poving his kump. Parmily a narg horped some whev in his kump. "Why did vump horp whev in my frinkle kump?" the marlup jufd the narg. "Er'm muvvily trungy," the narg grupped. "Er heshed vump norpled whev in your kump. Do vump pove your kump frinkle?"

by Nancy L. Hadaway, Sylvia M. Vardell, and Terrell A. Young
Literature-Based Instruction with English Language Learners
Full transcript