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Baths of Diocletian

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Ashley Eccleston

on 31 October 2012

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Transcript of Baths of Diocletian

Ashley Eccleston The Baths of Diocletian When was it built? Built By: The Emperor Diocletian Purpose: The Baths were a modern day fitness center. You would socialize with friends, bathe, swim, exercise in the gym, go to the library, to the theater, and most of all unwind from the day. Interior: The Baths could hold up to 3,000 people at one time and was about 12,000 square miles. The Exterior In the exterior of the baths they used stucco which gave it the impression of stonework. Built between 298 AD and 305 AD The Frigidarium The Frigdarium from the Latin word frigio which means cold, contained the swimming pools. The Caldarium The Caldarium, comes from the Latin word caleo, which means to be hot, contains the hot baths, saunas, and steam rooms. Architchture The Baths have the "Classical" look and it gave the impression of it being more open
Present Day Today Parts of the Baths still stand and have been turned into other land marks:

*The Frigidorium: Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri
*Circular Room: The church of San Bernardo alle Terme
*Main Hall: Part of the National Roman Museum


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