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Harriet Jacobs

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by

traquan branch

on 27 February 2014

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Transcript of Harriet Jacobs

Question 1
Question 5
How does the phrase “loophole of retreat” evoke multiple meanings? Are there other chapter titles that play with meaning in the same way?

Question 4
How does the phrase “loophole of retreat” evoke multiple meanings? Are there other chapter titles that play with meaning in the same way?

Question 2
According to Incidents, what particular challenges did young slave girls face? How does Linda prove that slavery is worse for girls?
Question 3
Harriet Jacobs
Answer
Answer
Answer
Harriet stayed in a little place for seven years that was very small.
Answer
Biography
Born into slavery to Elijah and Delilah Jacobs in 1813, Harriet Ann Jacobs grew up in Edenton, N.C., the daughter of slaves owned by different families. Her father was a skilled carpenter, whose earnings allowed Harriet and her brother, John, to live with their parents in a comfortable home. Her grandmother, Molly Horniblow, was a beloved adult in young Harriet’s life – a confidant who doled out encouraging advice along with bits of crackers and sweets for her grandchildren.
At what points does Jacobs draw attention to the fact that her story is different from other slave narratives? What differences does she point out, and how do they matter to the story?
When Incidents first came out, many people assumed it was fiction. What elements might have suggested that the account wasn't true?

Answer
Full transcript