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Hearing Conservation

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by

Dana Fink

on 11 July 2014

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Transcript of Hearing Conservation


I hadn’t really noticed that I had a hearing
problem. I just thought most people had
given up on speaking clearly.

Hal Linden

THINK SAFETY
Zero Losses is our Goal

We believe that Zero Losses is an achievable goal for our company.

Our ultimate goal for safety and health is the prevention of all loss incidents.

No employee or consumer is permitted to work in an unsafe manner.

No Supervisor is permitted to require or allow employees or consumers reporting to them to work in an unsafe manner.

Primary difference is perception

No instrument can distinguish between noise and sound
Noise vs. Sound
Can Be

Temporary – After a loud concert, usually recovers, varies with age and health

Permanent – Hearing gradually decreases, does not recover
Noise Induced Hearing Loss

Initial hearing loss typically starts at the 4000 Hz range
Hearing becomes “muffled”
Cannot be measured “directly” by checking for damage
Hearing tests (audiograms) measure an individuals ability to hear various frequencies
Noise Induced Hearing Loss
The next two slides show a normal hearing chart and a hearing loss chart

Right ear = 0
Left ear = X

Notice how the chart drops significantly at the 4000 Hz range on the second chart
Hearing Charts (Audiograms)
4000 Hz
Hearing loss can be prevented by
Wearing hearing protection
Ear plugs
Ear muffs
Engineering Controls
Sound barriers or walls
Machinery designed for
noise reduction

Hearing Loss Prevention
OSHA requires employers to provide hearing protection for employees to use when the average noise levels reach 85 dB in an 8 hour workday.

OSHA requires hearing protection to be worn when average noise levels reach 90 dB or higher in an 8 hour workday.
When to Wear Hearing Protection
The higher the rating, the better the protection (actual protection = 2.5 dB)
Sample Noise Reduction Rating
Advantages:
small and easily carried
convenient to use with other personal protection equipment (can be worn with ear muffs)
more comfortable for long-term wear in hot, humid work areas
convenient for use in confined work areas
Disadvantages:
requires more time to fit
more difficult to insert and remove
require good hygiene practices
may irritate the ear canal
easily misplaced
more difficult to see and monitor usage
Ear Plugs
Advantages:
small and easily carried
convenient to use with other personal protection equipment (can be worn with ear muffs)
more comfortable for long-term wear in hot, humid work areas
convenient for use in confined work areas
Disadvantages:
requires more time to fit
more difficult to insert and remove
require good hygiene practices
may irritate the ear canal
easily misplaced
more difficult to see and monitor usage
Ear Plugs
Advantages:
small and easily carried
convenient to use with other personal protection equipment (can be worn with ear muffs)
more comfortable for long-term wear in hot, humid work areas
convenient for use in confined work areas
Disadvantages:
requires more time to fit
more difficult to insert and remove
require good hygiene practices
may irritate the ear canal
easily misplaced
more difficult to see and monitor usage
Ear Plugs
Advantages:
less attenuation variability among users
designed so that one size fits most head sizes
easily seen at a distance to assist in the monitoring of their use
not easily misplaced or lost
may be worn with minor ear infections
Disadvantages:
less portable and heavier
more inconvenient for use with other personal protective equipment.
more uncomfortable in hot, humid work areas
more inconvenient for use in confined work areas
may interfere with the wearing of safety or prescription glasses: wearing glasses results in breaking the seal between the ear muff and the skin and results in decreased hearing protection.
Ear Muffs
Hearing protection does not reduce noise exposure when worn incorrectly

Proper fitting techniques are explained in the following video
Hearing Protection
A pin drop 10 dB
A whisper 30 dB
A refrigerator 50 dB
A shower 70 dB
A lawn mower 90 dB
A handheld drill 100 dB
A rock band 110 dB
A thunder clap 120 dB
A shotgun 160 dB
Common Noise Levels
Steps for reducing noise exposure in the workplace
Reduce noise at the source
Isolate the vibration
Step back from the source of noise when possible
Reduce the amount of time exposed to the noise
Use hearing protection
Steps for Reducing Noise Exposure
Loud noise is one of the leading causes of hearing loss. But some simple steps can help reduce your risk.
Turn down the volume.
Keep your iPod or mp3 player at about 60 percent of maximum volume and don't listen for more than an hour at a time.
Also turn down your cell phone headset.
Switch out ear buds for headphones that cancel out background noise so you can keep the volume low.
If you're mowing the lawn, working with power tools, or going to a concert, wear foam or custom-molded ear plugs.
And see your doctor or an audiologist for regular hearing tests.
Steps for Reducing Noise Exposure
How do you
know which
type of hearing
protection is
best for you?

Contribute to hearing loss
Interfere with communication
Annoy or distract
Alter performance of tasks
Cause irritability, anxiety, stress
High blood pressure and elevated pulse rate
What can Noise do?
Noise is:
Sound without information
Randomly variable
Constant
Unpleasant
Unnecessary
Unwanted
Noise can be any of these, or all of these, depending on a person’s perception.

What is sound?

Sound is pressure
variations the
ear can detect.
Sound
4000 Hz
Hearing Loss Chart
Normal Hearing Chart
How do you
know which
type of hearing
protection is
best for you?
Hearing Protection
Ear plugs and ear muffs are rated for noise reduction, called Noise Reduction Rating or NRR (measured in decibels or dB)
28 dB NRR actually provides 10.5 dB of protection, so; (After using an equation specifically for NRR)
90 dB of noise – 28 dB NRR does not equal 62 dB of actual noise exposure
Actual protection is 90 dB – 10.5 dB does equal 79.5 dB of actual noise exposure
(For informational purposes only)
Hearing Protection
Ear plugs and ear muffs are rated for noise reduction, called Noise Reduction Rating or NRR (measured in decibels or dB)
28 dB NRR actually provides 10.5 dB of protection, so; (After using an equation specifically for NRR)
90 dB of noise – 28 dB NRR does not equal 62 dB of actual noise exposure
Actual protection is 90 dB – 10.5 dB does equal 79.5 dB of actual noise exposure
(For informational purposes only)
Hearing Protection
Hearing Conservation
Advantages:
small and easily carried
convenient to use with other personal protection equipment (can be worn with ear muffs)
more comfortable for long-term wear in hot, humid work areas
convenient for use in confined work areas
Disadvantages:
requires more time to fit
more difficult to insert and remove
require good hygiene practices
may irritate the ear canal
easily misplaced
more difficult to see and monitor usage
Ear Plugs
Full transcript