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Author's Argument/Bias

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by

Shira Carroll

on 14 November 2017

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Transcript of Author's Argument/Bias

More Review
1. What are the three main author's purposes?

2. What are the 4 main text structures?
I ran down the steps of my apartment at full speed and sprinted toward school. I was late for school and I was terrified that I would get another late slip– my third this month. As I approached the front door to my school, I heard the alarm go off. The principal was there waiting for me.
“Running a little late, aren’t we?” asked my principal.
“I’m sorry! I didn’t hear my alarm!” I yelled.
The principal glared at me and walked away.
Jimmy ran down the steps of his apartment at full speed and sprinted toward school. As he approached the front door to his school, he heard the alarm go off. The principal was there waiting for him.
“Running a little late, aren’t we?” asked his principal.
“I’m sorry! I didn’t hear my alarm!” yelled Jimmy.
The principal glared at him and walked away.
Essential Question 3
Targets
17. I can determine an author's argument in a piece of text.
18. I can identify reasons and evidence an author uses in an argument.
Learning Targets
I can determine author's bias by identifying what their point of view/opinion is through words and phrases

I can determine how author's bias can affect my understanding of the topic.
Author's Argument/Bias
Review
1. What is the topic of a text?

2. What is the central idea?


New Information
credibility: if an author is credible, their information is believable.
Review
1. What does it mean to be credible?




2. What does it mean to have bias?
How can I use critical thinking skills to determine validity?
**Authors that are not credible may let their own opinions cloud their judgement. We call that bias**
bias: prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair or unbalanced.
New Information
The giant panda is a bearlike animal that has thick white fur with black markings on its ears, limbs, shoulders, and around its eyes. The giant panda feeds on bamboo forests at high altitudes in western China. It also eats bulbs, roots, eggs, and some small mammals. The cubs are born in late winter. The giant panda is an endangered species and is protected by the Chinese government.
Point of view can be broken up into TWO things

(1) Who is telling the story?
From whose point of view is the story told?

(2) What is that person’s point of view about the subject?
Perspective/bias – a person’s opinion about something

I was standing outside the school building making sure all the students were safe since the fire alarm had just gone off. I noticed Jimmy sprinting towards the building, about to be late for the third time this month.
“Running a little late, aren’t we?” I asked with concern.
“I’m sorry! I didn’t hear my alarm!” Jimmy snapped at me.
I gave him a stern look to show my disapproval and then walked away without punishing him.
Full transcript