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Satire

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Sashang Suraj

on 19 May 2014

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Transcript of Satire

Satire is a form in art or writing which ridicules either a person, government, or an institution, often through the use of humour.
Satire can either be in paintings, plays, books, songs, TV or movies.
Satire
Summary
Satire
Satire
1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch
Satire was used long ago, even as long ago as the Ancient Greeks. It was widely known in Elizabethan times.
Swift used satire in his book Gulliver's Travels to make fun of people’s stupidity. Works like The Beggar’s Opera (1728) used satire to show how silly the politicians of the time were.
The German playwright Bertolt Brecht used a lot of satire, as did Peter Cook. More recently Jon Stewart and other comedians use it frequently
Jonathan Swift
The German playwright Bertolt Brecht
There are three main types of satire: Horatian, Juvenalian, and Menippean.
Horatian satire gently mocks, Juvenal aims to destroy and to provoke, and Menippean spreads its mental barbs at a wide number of targets.
Horatian satire is the gentlest of the types of satire.
It does not aim to find evil in things; instead, it is done from an affectionate, almost loving point of view.
The emphasis is put on humor and on making fun of human dysfunction. While the subject of the fun can be social vices, it is usually an individual's follies that are teased.
A key element of Horatian satire, unlike most other types, is that the audience is also laughing at themselves as well as at the subject of the mockery.
Menippean satire is named after Menippus, and most closely resembles Juvenal's ideas on satire; however, it lacks the focus of a primary target.
Rather than a single target, it takes a scattergun approach that aims poisonous prongs at multiple targets. As well as not sustaining narrative and being more rhapsodic.
Menippean satire is also more mental. That said, this type of humor is typically baser at the same time.
Group Members
1)Sashang(Facilitator)
2)Thomas(Facilitator)
3)Saurav(Facilitator)
4)Sanjeev(Facilitator)
5)Rayhaan(Encourager)
Horatian
1)What is satire ?
2)What is Horatian Satire ?
3)What is the nature of juvenal satire ?
4)The menippean satire is named after ......
5)What is the aim of juvenal satire ?
6)Bertolt Bercht is a ............playwright .
Satire is a form in art or writing which ridicules either a person, government, or an institution, often through the use of humour.
There are three main types of satire: Horatian, Juvenalian, and Menippean.
Horatian satire gently mocks, Juvenal aims to destroy and to provoke, and Menippean spreads its mental barbs at a wide number of targets.
Horatian satire is the gentlest of the types of satire.
Juvenal satire is the harshest type of satire.
Menippean satire is named after Menippus, and most closely resembles Juvenal's ideas on satire; however, it lacks the focus of a primary target.
Rather than a single target, it takes a scattergun approach that aims poisonous prongs at multiple targets.
Juvenal Satire
Menippean satire
Horatian satire is a literary term for lighthearted, gentle satire that points out general human failings. It is usually contrasted with Juvenalian satire, which offers barbed jabs at specific immoral and corrupt behavior. Horatian satire is named after the Roman poet Horace, whose work has had a wide influence on Western culture. This form of satire is still practiced in modern times by cartoonists, comedians and comedy writers.
Juvenalian satire is one of the two major divisions of satire, and is characterized by its bitter and abrasive nature. It can be directly contrasted with Horatian satire, which utilizes a much gentler form of ridicule to highlight folly or oddity.
A Juvenalian satirist is much more likely to see the targets of his satire as evil or actively harmful to society, and to attack them with serious intent to harm their reputation or power. While Juvenalian satire often attacks individuals on a personal level, its most common objective is social criticism.
Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is an example of Menippean satire.
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